Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Coating Could Strengthen Nation's Infrastructure

22.05.2009
Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed a glass-based coating for reinforcement bars that helps prevent corrosion and strengthens the bond between steel and concrete. This material could help engineers build stronger bridges and increase the longevity of other steel-reinforced structures.

Currently, the U.S. market for polymer-coated and galvanized rebar in the construction industry is more than $4 billion per year. But research has shown that polymer coatings are not providing adequate corrosion protection for the rebar that helps to reinforce the nation’s aging infrastructure.

The Missouri S&T coating is an engineered mixture of glass, clays and water. A slurry is applied to the rebar and heated to more than 1,400 degrees Fahrenheit. The coating, which adheres to steel, promotes bonding with concrete and works to prevent corrosion from water and salt.

Missouri S&T has filed for a patent on the technology, which was developed by a team of researchers led by Dr. Richard Brow, Curators’ Professor of materials science and engineering, and Dr. Genda Chen, professor of civil, architectural and environmental engineering and interim director of the Center for Infrastructure Engineering Studies at S&T. The research was funded by the Leonard Wood Institute.

The Department of Defense has used related technology to develop blast-resistant walls. Brow and Chen realized that some ideas originally conceived by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers could be built upon in order to engineer the glass-ceramic coating for rebar.

Missouri S&T recently licensed the new technology to Pro-Perma Engineered Coatings in St. Louis. “The goal is to take innovations like this out of the laboratory, team up with partners, solve problems, and make an economic impact,” says Keith Strassner, director of technology transfer and economic development at Missouri S&T.

Mike Koenigstein, who earned a bachelor’s degree in ceramic engineering at Missouri S&T in 1993, is managing partner of Pro-Perma. So far, he says, the company has two projects in the works that utilize the new coating. The first will involve the strengthening of marine structures in Corpus Christi, Texas. Next, Koenigstein plans to strengthen a sea wall near Pearl Harbor in Oahu. Both projects are sponsored by the Department of Defense.

In addition to protecting structures from water and salt, Brow and Chen say the new coating would help make bridges and buildings stronger in earthquake-prone regions.

According to Chen, there are approximately 800 short-span bridges in Missouri that need to be retrofitted or replaced. In addition, more than 200 longer-span bridges are in urgent need of rehabilitation.

Strassner and Koenigstein think the new rebar coating will prove to be in high demand. They envision opening a pilot plant dedicated to producing the glass-based coating in Rolla, which is already home to high-tech glass manufacturer Mo-Sci Corp. as well as Missouri S&T.

Pro-Perma and Mo-Sci are working as partners to commercialize the technology developed at Missouri S&T.

“We have all of the resources here to support technology-driven businesses,” Strassner says. “We want to be an economic engine for the state of Missouri.”

Lance Feyh | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.mst.edu

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Serendipity uncovers borophene's potential
23.02.2017 | Northwestern University

nachricht Switched-on DNA
20.02.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>