Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Acoustic resonance testing for nondestructive detection of forged or casted serial parts

07.06.2016

The Fraunhofer Institute for Nondestructive Testing IZFP carries out research and development activities in the field of nondestructive testing processes along the entire materials value chain. For customers in the automobile, aerospace, rail, energy, construction and agriculture industries, the institute offers a wide range of NDT expertise and technologies. At the 19th World Conference on Non-Destructive Testing, our engineers will be presenting the acoustic resonance testing (ART) - an integral nondestructive testing method that is used to inspect components and assemblies with regard to different properties or variations in quality.

Acoustic resonance testing (ART) is an integral nondestructive testing method that is used to inspect components and assemblies with regard to different properties or variations in quality by evaluating the test object’s eigenfrequencies or other parameters determined from its natural vibration behavior.


Acoustic resonance analysis

Fraunhofer IZFP/Uwe Bellhäuser

As a comparative method, ART mainly focusses on the examination of serial parts which are produced in large quantities and with low cycle times, e.g. forged or casted metallic parts. Besides the possibility for complete automation, a big advantage of ART compared to other volume-oriented methods is the fast in-line quality assessment of an entire specimen within a matter of seconds.

The principle of ART is based on the fact that a specimen’s natural vibration behavior and its eigenfrequencies mainly depend on geometry and material properties, but also on structural defects, e.g. cracks.

One objective of ART is to detect defective parts by evaluating the test object’s measured eigenfrequencies. Generally, the exact geometric dimensions and the exact material properties of single parts in a serial production vary randomly within acceptable ranges, for example because of manufacture-related effects, entailing variations in the eigenfrequencies of the good parts.

These effects are superposed by changes in the eigenfrequencies caused by intolerable component variations. This impedes a reliable classification of the components with the help of ART. To solve this problem a new compensation method of those random perturbations respectively a method to differ between eigenfrequency shifts caused by acceptable as well as intolerable variations is required.

A current research project focusses on detecting forged or casted metallic parts with intolerable geometric variations by evaluating the component’s eigenfrequencies, whereat such parts are also characterized by large acceptable component variations.

Previous investigations using simulated data showed that the exact dimensions of components can be estimated from their eigenfrequencies after describing those correlations with the help of linear regression analyses. This contribution presents the latest results of the project, especially the adjustment of this procedure to real parts and the associated difficulties.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.izfp.fraunhofer.de

Sabine Poitevin-Burbes | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zerstörungsfreie Prüfverfahren IZFP

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials
21.07.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht High-tech sensing illuminates concrete stress testing
20.07.2017 | University of Leeds

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>