Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A Close-up View of Materials as they Stretch or Compress

09.09.2015

A team of researchers has created a new tool to nondestructively characterize structural materials in unprecedented detail as they deform, which, in turn, could lead to aerospace components that are lighter and more tolerant to damage.

Materials scientists are busy developing advanced materials, while also working to squeeze every bit of performance out of existing materials. This is particularly true in the aerospace industry, where small advantages in weight or extreme temperature tolerance quickly translate into tremendous performance benefits.


Review of Scientific Instruments

This setup is used for high-energy diffraction microscopy experiments—it involves a rotational and axial motion system load frame insert in a conventional load frame along with near-field and far-field detectors. The loading axis is vertical, and the specimen and specimen grips rotate around the loading axis while the rest of the setup remains stationary.

The potential pay-offs motivated a team of researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory, the Advanced Photon Source, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University and PulseRay to work together to pursue their shared goal of characterizing structural materials in unprecedented detail.

In a paper in Review of Scientific Instruments, from AIP Publishing, the group describes how they created a system to squeeze and stretch a material while at the same time rotating and bombarding it with high-energy synchrotron X-rays. The X-rays capture information about how the material responds to the mechanical stress.

“This required developing a loading system to enable the precise rotation of a sample while simultaneously and independently applying tensile or compressive axial loading,” explained Paul A. Shade, lead author and a materials research engineer for the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

Their approach included “developing and validating micromechanical models to help us understand the sources of failure in materials so that we can produce aerospace components that are lighter and more damage tolerant -- while also gaining a more complete understanding of their service lifetime capability,” Shade added.

The main significance of the team’s new tool is that “the RAMS load frame insert enables applying axial loads while the specimen is continuously rotated, which means that we can integrate near-field and far-field high-energy diffraction microscopy methods and microtomography with in situ mechanical testing,” said Shade. “This allows us to nondestructively characterize the microstructure and micromechanical state of a deforming material—providing critical validation data for microstructure-sensitive performance-prediction models.”

The materials community is interested in using the team's tool as part of an integrated computational materials engineering approach to design structural components -- which could help optimize materials properties and reduce uncertainty for given applications. The measurements that this tool enables can be used to develop new materials for turbine engines, car parts and industrial machinery, to name just a few applications.

“An important aspect is to develop trusted materials models whose performance has been validated at the appropriate length scale,” Shade said.

The next step for the team will be partnering with researchers at the Cornell High Energy Synchronous Source (CHESS), Cornell University and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory to develop standalone RAMS load frames. “These instruments will be made available to the high-energy synchrotron X-ray community and, in fact, have already been used by many researchers and institutions,” Shade noted.

The team is currently working with CHESS and APS to develop elevated temperature and multi-axial loading capabilities. The RAMS load frame insert has also inspired the development of a tension in-vacuum furnace design for studying irradiated materials at APS that was developed in concert with the Nuclear Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory.

“We plan to host the datasets we collect from these experiments for others in the community to use -- especially to test new materials models,” Shade said. “In this manner, we’ll help propel the community to develop microstructure-sensitive materials models and provide the validation needed to push materials to the next level of performance.”

The article, “A rotational and axial motion system load frame insert for in situ high- energy x-ray studies,” is authored by Paul A. Shade, Basil Blank, Jay C. Schuren, Todd J. Turner, Peter Kenesei, Kurt Goetze, Robert M. Suter, Joel V. Bernier, Shiu Fai Li, Jonathan Lind, Ulrich Lienert and Jonathan Almer. It appears in the journal Review of Scientific Instruments on September 8, 2015. After that date, it can be accessed at: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/rsi/86/9/10.1063/1.4927855 

The authors of this paper are affiliated with Air Force Research Laboratory, PulseRay, Argonne National Laboratory, Carnegie Mellon University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

ABOUT THE JOURNAL

The journal Review of Scientific Instruments, which is produced by AIP Publishing, presents innovation in instrumentation and methods across disciplines. See http://rsi.aip.org

Contact Information
Jason Socrates Bardi
+1 240-535-4954
jbardi@aip.org
@jasonbardi

Jason Socrates Bardi | newswise

Further reports about: AIP RAMS Review of Scientific Instruments materials physics

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Using a simple, scalable method, a material that can be used as a sensor is developed
15.02.2017 | University of the Basque Country

nachricht New mechanical metamaterials can block symmetry of motion, findings suggest
14.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>