Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Few to no work efficiencies when different providers read different scans on same patient

10.04.2013
Medicare estimates of potential work savings greatly exaggerated

According to a new study published online in the Journal of the American College of Radiology, any efficiencies in physician interpretation and diagnosis gained when different providers interpret different medical imaging scans performed on the same patient are minute and vary by procedure.

Specifically, no potential intra-service work duplication was found when different exam interpretations were rendered by different physicians in the same group practice. Small potential efficiencies were found possible regarding pre- and post-service activities. Across all modalities (scan types), this corresponds to a maximum Medicare professional component physician fee reduction of only 0.95 percent to 1.87 percent for services regarding the same type of scan. For services from different modalities, potential duplications were too small to even quantify.

This issue is debated in health policy circles because the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) recently enacted a 25 percent Multiple Procedure Payment Reduction to Medicare reimbursement for interpretation of advanced diagnostic imaging scans performed on the same patient, in the same session. This reduction applies across all physicians in a group or practice. It does not affect the number of scans ordered, only interpretation of scans already performed. This type of reduction has recently been expanded to physical therapy, cardiovascular and ophthalmology technical services as well.

"These findings are important because the exams affected are primarily used to care for the most sick or injured patients — those with massive head and body trauma, stroke or widespread cancer. These people often require interpretations by different doctors to survive. This study shows that the data Medicare used to justify funding cuts was inflated by 1,200 percent and not reflective of clinical practice," said Geraldine McGinty, M.D., chair of the American College of Radiology Commission on Economics.

Because each imaging study produces a set of images requiring individual interpretation, a physician is ethically and professionally obligated to expend the same time and effort, regardless of the date or time of service. Studies show that medical imaging use and imaging costs are down significantly since 2006.

"While potential efficiencies exist in physician pre- and post-service work when same-session, same-modality imaging services are rendered by different physicians in the same group practice, these are relatively minuscule, and have been grossly overestimated. These findings support the need for greater transparency and methodological rigor when health care regulatory actions are taken," said McGinty.

To arrange an interview with an ACR spokesperson, please contact Shawn Farley.

Shawn Farley | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.acr.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Disarray in the brain
18.12.2017 | Universität zu Lübeck

nachricht Amputees can learn to control a robotic arm with their minds
28.11.2017 | University of Chicago Medical Center

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Error-free into the Quantum Computer Age

A study carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors.

In order to reach their full potential, today’s quantum computer prototypes have to meet specific criteria: First, they have to be made bigger, which means...

Im Focus: Search for planets with Carmenes successful

German and Spanish researchers plan, build and use modern spectrograph

Since 2016, German and Spanish researchers, among them scientists from the University of Göttingen, have been hunting for exoplanets with the “Carmenes”...

Im Focus: First-of-its-kind chemical oscillator offers new level of molecular control

DNA molecules that follow specific instructions could offer more precise molecular control of synthetic chemical systems, a discovery that opens the door for engineers to create molecular machines with new and complex behaviors.

Researchers have created chemical amplifiers and a chemical oscillator using a systematic method that has the potential to embed sophisticated circuit...

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

The body's street sweepers

18.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Fast flowing heat in layered material heterostructures

18.12.2017 | Materials Sciences

Life on the edge prepares plants for climate change

18.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>