Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Volunteering via companies

15.07.2013
Fraunhofer IAO studies the importance of voluntary work to companies

Fewer and fewer people are committing themselves to dedicated volunteering organizations, with many preferring to support causes on an ad hoc basis. Many companies also encourage their staff to support non-profit projects. Fraunhofer IAO is using an online survey to study the importance companies attach to employees’ voluntary work.

The recent floods across parts of Germany drew a great many volunteers from all corners of the country, a phenomenon much reported in the media. Integrating all these volunteers into disaster relief and crisis management structures calls for a major organizational and coordination effort on the part of local relief agencies. And the scope of these tasks will only expand in future: ever fewer people are willing to volunteer through dedicated organizations, instead preferring to support causes on an ad hoc basis. That is why, whenever an emergency occurs, agencies such as the Red Cross or Germany’s Federal Agency for Technical Relief (THW) are having to train up people who have no prior experience and coordinate their activities, all in next to no time and under the harshest of conditions.

Companies, too, have discovered the benefits of volunteering. Some are giving employees time off work to carry out voluntary aid work, while others are making whole teams of people available for a given volunteer project. These instances of companies systematically encouraging employees’ voluntary work or sending staff directly to work on non-profit projects is known as Corporate Volunteering.

As part of the INKA project, which is focused on the professional integration of volunteers into disaster prevention and crisis management, Fraunhofer IAO is studying how companies cooperate with relief agencies and how they can encourage their staff to do voluntary work. Fraunhofer scientists are using an online survey to find out how important companies feel such volunteering efforts are. In particular, they are hoping to discover whether and where there are any barriers to supporting employees’ willingness to volunteer and how companies can make it easier for them – especially for disaster relief. The online survey takes around 15 minutes to complete and is accessible from June 26 to July 31, 2013.

Fraunhofer IAO is hoping for participation from as many companies as possible, of all sizes and from all sectors. On request, participants will receive a summary of the study’s results.

The INKA project is funded by Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). It brings together representatives from the fields of civil protection, civil society, science and business in order to analyze structures of voluntary involvement from a variety of perspectives and to test out groundbreaking new concepts in practice.

Juliane Segedi | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:
http://www.iao.fraunhofer.de/lang-en/business-areas/service-and-human-resources-management/1058-volunteering-via-companies.html

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>