Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

In vitro studies assess the optimal concentration of propolis as a radioprotector in future clinical applications

05.07.2012
A team of researchers from the University of Valencia, the Universitat Politècnica de València, the University Hospital La Fe and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona conducted in vitro studies of cytotoxicity (cellular affection) to assess the optimal concentration level of propolis in which this natural substance extracted from bee resin would offer the maximum protection against ionised radiation and not be toxic for blood cells.
According to the results of the research, this optimal concentration level is between 120-500 micrograms/mL. "Within this range can be found maximum protection against radiation-induced damage and the substance does not reveal neither a cytotoxicity nor a genotoxicity effect on non-irradiated human lymphocytes", says Alegria Montoro, head of the Laboratory of Biological Dosimetry at the University Hospital La Fe and lecturer of the Master in Radiological Protection in Radioactive and Nuclear Facilities offered by the UPV.

The conclusions of this study, which receives funding from the Spanish Nuclear Security Council (CSN), represent a starting point for future clinical applications using propolis. The results were published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology; in August a full revision of the study will be presented at the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society EMBC12, which will be held in San Diego, California.

In the study, the team of researchers used four genetic biomarkers, including the mytotic index and the cell proliferation kinetics, with the aim of determining whether propolis has cytotoxic effects on cells. "Using these biomarkers makes it possible to discover how a substance affects cell division: a substance which is cytotoxic and modifies the cell division stage would do so by accelerating, slowing down or even stopping the process, and all three effects are negative", explains Alegria Montoro.

The other two biomarkers used are the study of the possible induction of chromosome alterations in non-irradiated cultures at different concentration levels and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), a genetic biomarker of exposure to chemical agents.

"With this study we already know the in vitro experimental level, the concentration of propolis to be used to make it act as a radiation protector agent, without being cyto/genotoxic for normal cells. This is the first step, a starting point for future clinical assays. The final objective is to develop capsules containing the adequate dosis of propolis, but many more hours of research are needed before we are able to do this", Alegria Montoro adds.

UAB lecturer Francesc Barquinero, currently on leave to work at the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) headquarters in Fontenay aux Roses, France, participated in the original planning of the study and its design, as well as the interpretation of the results and posterior contextualisation of other studies published.

In 2008, researchers at the Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety (ISIRyM) of the Universitat Politècnica de València and the University Hospital La Fe demonstrated that propolis can reduce by half the damage inflicted on chromosomes by ionised radiations, thus protecting the DNA from these effects. The new study is fundamental in discovering the range of concentrations in which this substance can have a toxic effect on non-irradiated cells.

Lauren Kelly Wickman | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ruvid.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Antarctic Ice Sheet mass loss has increased
14.06.2018 | Technische Universität Dresden

nachricht WAKE-UP provides new treatment option for stroke patients | International study led by UKE
17.05.2018 | Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

Im Focus: Overdosing on Calcium

Nano crystals impact stem cell fate during bone formation

Scientists from the University of Freiburg and the University of Basel identified a master regulator for bone regeneration. Prasad Shastri, Professor of...

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Polar ice may be softer than we thought

22.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

What are the effects of coral reef marine protected areas?

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>