Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Threat from West Antarctica less than previously believed

18.05.2009
The potential contribution to sea level rise from a collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) have been greatly overestimated, according to a new study published in the journal Science.

Scientists estimate global sea level would rise 3.3 metres, not five or six, as previously thought. The Atlantic and Pacific seaboards of the US, even in the case of a partial collapse, would experience the largest increases, threatening cities such as New York, Washington DC and San Francisco.

Long thought of as the sleeping giant with respect to sea level rise, Antarctica holds about nine times the volume of ice of Greenland. Its western ice sheet is of particular interest to scientists due to its unusual below-sea level topography, which is believed to make it inherently unstable. But the area's potential contribution to sea level has been greatly overestimated, according to new calculations.

Professor Jonathan Bamber at Bristol University, lead author of the study, said: "There's a vast body of research that's looked at the likelihood of a WAIS collapse and what implications such a catastrophic event would have for the globe. Yet all of these studies have assumed a five- to-six-metre contribution to sea level rise. Our calculation shows those estimates are much too large, even on a thousand year timescale."

Jonathan Bamber, Professor in Physical Geography, at the University's School of Geographical Sciences is currently a Visiting Fellow at the University of Colorado at Boulder's Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, or CIRES.

Instead of assuming a complete disintegration of the whole WAIS, Bamber and colleagues used models, based on glaciological theory, to simulate how the massive ice sheet would respond if the floating ice shelves fringing the continent broke free. Vast ice shelves currently block the WAIS from spilling into the Weddell and Ross Seas, limiting total ice loss to the ocean.

According to theory, if these floating ice shelves were removed, sizeable areas of the WAIS would become, in effect, undammed, triggering an acceleration of the ice sheet towards the ocean and a "rapid" inland migration of the grounding line, the point where the ice sheet's margins meets the ocean and begins to float.

The most unstable areas of the WAIS are those grounded below sea level on bedrock with negative bedslope, where the bedrock slopes downwards inland. Once undammed, these areas would quickly become buoyant, forming new floating ice shelves further inland and, in time, precipitating further break up and collapse.

For their calculations, the researchers assumed that only these areas would collapse and contribute to sea level rise. In contrast, they assumed areas grounded above sea level, or on bedrock that slopes upwards inland, would likely retain substantial ice masses.

Professor Bamber said: "Unlike the world's other major ice sheets – the East Antarctic Ice Sheet and Greenland – WAIS is the only one with such an unstable configuration."

Just how "rapid" a collapse of the WAIS would be is largely unknown. Though if such a large mass of ice steadily melted over 500 years, as suggested in an early study, it would add about 6.5 millimetres per year to sea level rise: twice the current rate due to all sources.

Professor Bamber added: "Interestingly, the pattern of sea level rise is independent of how fast or how much of the WAIS collapses. Even if the WAIS contributed only a metre of sea level rise over many years, sea levels along North America's shorelines would still increase 25 per cent more than the global average."

Regional variations in sea level would be largely driven by the redistribution of ice mass from the Antarctic continent to the oceans, according to the study. With less mass at the South Pole, Earth's gravity field would weaken in the Southern Hemisphere and strengthen in the North, causing water to pile up in the northern oceans.

This redistribution of mass would also affect Earth's rotation, which in turn would cause water to build up along the North American continent and in the Indian Ocean.

The study was conducted with support from the National Environmental Research Council (NERC) and in collaboration with Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands and the University of Durham.

Joanne Fryer | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bristol.ac.uk

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

Im Focus: Autonomous 3D scanner supports individual manufacturing processes

Let’s say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time. The autonomous scanning system will be on display at the Hannover Messe Preview on February 6 and at the Hannover Messe proper from April 23 to 27, 2018 (Hall 6, Booth A30).

Part of the charm of vintage cars is that they stopped making them long ago, so it is special when you do see one out on the roads. If something breaks or...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Fingerprints of quantum entanglement

16.02.2018 | Information Technology

'Living bandages': NUST MISIS scientists develop biocompatible anti-burn nanofibers

16.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Hubble sees Neptune's mysterious shrinking storm

16.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>