Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Ten-Year Follow-Up of Physical Activity among Adolescents

16.04.2013
A study from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows that the drop in boys’ physical activity during the teenage years levels off in early adulthood

In 2000, about 1000 children aged 6-14 from southeast Sweden participated in an international study on physical activity, body constitution and physical self-perception.

The new study is a follow-up study on a sample of the 12-year-olds in the original study. The researchers followed and reassessed the group at age 15, 17 and 22. As in the first study, they measured physical activity using a pedometer.

The results indicate a reduction in total daily physical activity from the early teenage years to early adulthood. The boys show a dramatic drop between the ages of 12 and 15. Girls are on average more active than boys at both 17 and 22.

The activity pattern – the question of whether the most active children are also the most active as adults – is maintained only to a low extent. However, those who were deemed insufficiently active at age 12 seemed to maintain their activity pattern to a larger extent as adults.

‘This is a problem. But low-activity children can be identified with simple methods like using a pedometer. They could then be targeted in school and through intervention programmes,’ says Anders Raustorp, Senior Lecturer at the Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg, and one of the researchers behind the new study.

While many previous studies have looked at what happens to adolescents’ exercise habits, this study also explores their overall levels of daily physical activity. Studies including objective measures of physical activity over the course of a whole decade in this age span are extremely rare.

Raustorp has previously published global steps-per-day recommendations for both children (2004 and 2011) and adults (2008). He has also introduced the pedometer in Swedish research and as a useful method in physiotherapy, and has become an authority within pedometer research.

His and his colleagues’ step-per-day recommendations for children and adolescents published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity are in frequent use.

Objective measurements based on validated pedometers and accelerometers offer new opportunities to measure and communicate physical activity as number of steps per day. This simple measure continues to gain respect and popularity among both researchers and practitioners as an acceptable way to assess total daily physical activity.

The study Tracking of pedometer determined physical activity. A 10 years follow-up study from adolescence to adulthood in Sweden was published online in December by Journal of Physical Activity & Health.

Contact :
Anders Raustorp, Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy at the Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Science, University of Gothenburg

+46 (0)31 786 4205, +46 (0)708 11 07 86, anders.raustorp@ped.gu.se

Annika Koldenius | idw
Further information:
http://www.gu.se

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Physics of bubbles could explain language patterns
25.07.2017 | University of Portsmouth

nachricht Obstructing the ‘inner eye’
07.07.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Programming cells with computer-like logic

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Identified the component that allows a lethal bacteria to spread resistance to antibiotics

27.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Malaria Already Endemic in the Mediterranean by the Roman Period

27.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>