Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Teens of epileptic moms display poor school performance

04.11.2010
Multiple antiepileptic drugs used during pregnancy may be the cause

A large population-based study revealed that multiple antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used by pregnant women to control seizures may cause poor school performance in their teenagers.

The research team from Karolinska University Hospital and the University of Lund in Sweden confirmed that exposure to AEDs in utero may have a negative effect on neurodevelopment. Their findings now appear online in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy.

Prior studies suggest that exposure to AEDs in utero may cause permanent damage to exposed children. Cognitive and behavioral issues, malformations, psychomotor delay, and lower intelligence quotient (IQ) have all been reported in research of standard therapies for epilepsy. Medical evidence also points out that polytherapy—when multiple AEDs are used—is more harmful than monotherapy (single AED therapy).

The Swedish research team used the Medical Birth Register, Patient Register, and a local study to identify women with epilepsy who gave birth between 1973 and 1986, and their anticonvulsant use during pregnancy. Children's performance in school was obtained from the School Mark Registry, which provides grades for all students leaving compulsory school (age 16 in Sweden). Researchers then linked the data from all registers and identified 1,235 children born to epileptic mothers using AEDs, comparing their school performance to all other children born in Sweden (1,307,083) during the stated time period.

Results showed 641 children were exposed to monotherapy, 429 to polytherapy, and 165 to no known AED treatments in the womb. Those children exposed to two or more AEDs had an increased risk of not receiving a final grade upon completion of schooling, while those exposed to a single anticonvulsant, mainly carbamazepine (CBZ) or phenytoin, did not.

In finding that children exposed to a single AED had no increased risk of completing school without a final grade, the authors confirmed previous medical evidence that failed to show negative effects on nervous system development after exposure to monotherapy. However, the current study did show these children had a reduced chance of earning a "pass with excellence" grade, indicating that single AED use may impair higher cognitive function.

"Our results suggest exposure to several AEDs in the womb may have a negative effect on the child's neurodevelopment," said lead study author Lisa Forsberg, M.D. The findings support current recommendations based upon a study by Harden et al., that if adequate seizure control can be obtained, polytherapy should be replaced by monotherapy during pregnancy to reduce the risk of poor cognitive outcomes. "If possible pregnant women should avoid using multiple anticonvulsants to treat their seizures," concluded Dr. Forsberg.

This study is published in Epilepsia. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact healthnews@wiley.com.

Full citation: "School Performance at Age 16 in Children Exposed to Antiepileptic Drugs in Utero: A Population-Based Study." Lisa Forsberg, Katarina Wide, and Bengt Källén. Epilepsia; Published Online: November 4, 2010 (DOI: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2010.02778.x).

Epilepsia is the leading, most authoritative source for current clinical and research results on all aspects of epilepsy. As the journal of the International League Against Epilepsy, subscribers every month will review scientific evidence and clinical methodology in: clinical neurology, neurophysiology, molecular biology, neuroimaging, neurochemistry, neurosurgery, pharmacology, neuroepidemiology, and therapeutic trials. For more information, please visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1528-1167.

Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons, with strengths in every major academic and professional field and partnerships with many of the world's leading societies. Wiley-Blackwell publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and 1,500+ new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works and laboratory protocols. For more information, please visit www.wileyblackwell.com or our new online platform, Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), one of the world's most extensive multidisciplinary collections of online resources, covering life, health, social and physical sciences, and humanities.

Dawn Peters | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>