Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Targeted Antibiotic Drug Safest Among Recommended Treatments For Irritable Bowel Disease

Among the most commonly used treatments for irritable bowel syndrome – which affects as many as 20 percent of the United States population – a targeted antibiotic was shown to be the safest in a new study by Cedars-Sinai researchers, based on an analysis of 26 large-scale clinical trials.

The study, for presentation at the American College of Gastroenterology annual meeting in Washington, D.C., examined drug interventions for IBS deemed to be of merit by a task force of the group . The study compared the therapies based on “number needed to harm statistics” from large clinical trials.

In evaluating a drug’s effectiveness, two common measures are the number needed to treat (the average number of patients who must take a therapy before one is treated successfully) and the number needed to harm (how many patients must be treated before the adverse effects of a therapy are bad enough that one patient drops the medication).

“For patients who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome, historically effective treatment options have been very scarce,” said Mark Pimentel, MD, director of the G.I. Motility Program at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and a lead author on the study. “Unfortunately, many of the treatments approved for IBS cause intolerable complications for many patients. This underscores the need for us to continue to seek new therapies for this disease, which dramatically harms quality of life for millions of people.”

The study looked at the most common and highly rated treatments for the condition. Three of these treatments are for diarrhea-predominant IBS: tricyclic antidepressants; alosetron – a drug that slows movement of stool in the gut; and rifaximin, an antibiotic absorbed only in the gut. The difference among these drugs was striking. For tricyclic inhibitors, the number needed to harm was 18.3, while the number needed to harm for alosetron was 19.4. For rifaximin, the number needed to harm was 8,971.

The study also found that for every 2.3 and 2.6 patients who benefitted from tricyclic inhibitors and alosetron respectively, one patient was harmed by the study medication and had to withdraw. For rifaximin, this number was 897.

“This further validates previous research we’ve done on rifaximin as a safe and effective treatment for IBS,” Pimentel said. “Now, not only have our previous clinical studies shown that this selectively absorbed antibiotic is the first treatment for IBS patients in which patients continue to have relief from their symptoms after stopping the drug – compared to other available treatments for the condition, it statistically has caused fewer adverse side effects.”

In an article published earlier this year in the New England Journal of Medicine, the ground-breaking therapy developed at Cedars-Sinai found through two double-blind trials that patients who suffered from diarrhea prominent IBS reported relief from bloating, less abdominal pain and improved stool consistency for up to 10 weeks. While the concept of bacteria playing a key role in IBS was controversial when first unveiled a decade ago, this research confirms that bacteria in the gut trigger the symptoms of the chronic condition, affecting an estimated 30 million people in the United States.

Rifaximin is marketed by Salix Pharmaceuticals Inc. Pimentel discovered the use of rifaximin for IBS, and Cedars-Sinai holds patent rights to this discovery and has licensed rights to the invention to Salix. Dr. Pimentel is a consultant to Salix Inc, and serves on its scientific advisory board.

Nicole White | Cedars-Sinai News
Further information:

Further reports about: Disease Drug Delivery IBS Recommended Safest antibiotic bowel effective treatment targeted treatments

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Diagnoses: When Are Several Opinions Better Than One?
19.07.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht High in calories and low in nutrients when adolescents share pictures of food online
07.04.2016 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Oasis of life in the ice-covered central Arctic

24.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

‘Farming’ bacteria to boost growth in the oceans

24.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

24.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>