Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Synchronizing a failing heart

15.11.2010
New hope and proven help for heart failure patients: International study proves medical device therapy to boosts a fading heart beat

One of the largest, most extensive worldwide investigations into heart failure, led by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI), conclusively proves that a new therapeutic implant synchronizes and strengthens a fading heart beat while reducing risk of death by 24% compared to the current treatment.

The research, co-led by Dr. Anthony Tang and Dr. George Wells at the Heart Institute, brings the promise of life-saving treatment for patients with symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure – an increasingly common condition among an aging population that can lead to sudden cardiac death. Each year, more than 500,000 Canadians and five million Americans suffer heart failure.

"This kind of device brings the potential to save thousands of lives in Canada alone and offers new hope to so many heart patients and their families. Helping the lower chambers of the heart beat strongly and in unison can improve a person's quality of life, keep them out of hospital longer and reduce their risk of sudden death," said Dr. Tang.

Results of the clinical trial, which got under way in 2003, were published online today in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (www.NJEM.org) and coincided with the release of the Heart Institute analysis at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association in Chicago. The research represents one of the largest international medical device trials undertaken in 2003, comprising 1,798 patients in 24 centres in Canada, Australia, Europe and Turkey.

The Ottawa team consisted largely of top electrophysiologists – cardiologists specializing in surgical procedures to regulate a faulty heart rhythm. Heart failure patients were implanted with either a basic miniature defibrillator (ICD) or with a new device carrying insulated wires called leads to transmit signals and electrical impulses to the heart in an effort to stimulate and coordinate the heart to be beating in-sync. This therapy is called cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT).

The study, which followed patients for an average of 40 months, showed that patients with CRT live longer with a reduction of the rate of death. In addition, patients with CRT were less likely to be admitted to hospital for worsening of heart failure.

Until now, no research had been undertaken to examine the specific benefits and survival rates in heart failure patients who have been implanted with a CRT along with an ICD.

"This trial represents a tremendous research success for cardiovascular scientists and demonstrates the importance of clinical evaluative research," said Dr. Alain Beaudet, President of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, which co-funded the research. "We congratulate the Heart Institute for its efforts, which will lead to better health outcomes and longer lives for heart patients."

"Medtronic recognizes the expertise of Canadian electrophysiologists and congratulates them for their leadership in participating and leading this key clinical trial to investigate the benefits of cardiac device therapy in heart failure patients," said Neil Fraser, President of Medtronic of Canada Ltd., which also co-funded the research. "This trial demonstrates that a broader population of heart failure patients could benefit from our therapies, including those with mild symptoms, and they should receive them."

About UOHI

The University of Ottawa Heart Institute is Canada's largest and foremost cardiovascular health centre dedicated to understanding, treating and preventing heart disease. We deliver high-tech care with a personal touch, shape the way cardiovascular medicine is practiced, and revolutionize cardiac treatment and understanding. We build knowledge through research and translate discoveries into advanced care. We serve the local, national and international community, and are pioneering a new era in heart health. For more information, visit www.ottawaheart.ca

For further information please contact:
Marlene Orton
Senior Manager, Public Affairs
University of Ottawa Heart Institute
613-761-4427
mobile: 613-599-6760
morton@ottawaheart.ca

Marlene Orton | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ottawaheart.ca

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Smart Data Transformation – Surfing the Big Wave
02.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

nachricht Climate change could outpace EPA Lake Champlain protections
18.11.2016 | University of Vermont

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

High-precision magnetic field sensing

05.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Construction of practical quantum computers radically simplified

05.12.2016 | Information Technology

NASA's AIM observes early noctilucent ice clouds over Antarctica

05.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>