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Synchronizing a failing heart

15.11.2010
New hope and proven help for heart failure patients: International study proves medical device therapy to boosts a fading heart beat

One of the largest, most extensive worldwide investigations into heart failure, led by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI), conclusively proves that a new therapeutic implant synchronizes and strengthens a fading heart beat while reducing risk of death by 24% compared to the current treatment.

The research, co-led by Dr. Anthony Tang and Dr. George Wells at the Heart Institute, brings the promise of life-saving treatment for patients with symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure – an increasingly common condition among an aging population that can lead to sudden cardiac death. Each year, more than 500,000 Canadians and five million Americans suffer heart failure.

"This kind of device brings the potential to save thousands of lives in Canada alone and offers new hope to so many heart patients and their families. Helping the lower chambers of the heart beat strongly and in unison can improve a person's quality of life, keep them out of hospital longer and reduce their risk of sudden death," said Dr. Tang.

Results of the clinical trial, which got under way in 2003, were published online today in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (www.NJEM.org) and coincided with the release of the Heart Institute analysis at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association in Chicago. The research represents one of the largest international medical device trials undertaken in 2003, comprising 1,798 patients in 24 centres in Canada, Australia, Europe and Turkey.

The Ottawa team consisted largely of top electrophysiologists – cardiologists specializing in surgical procedures to regulate a faulty heart rhythm. Heart failure patients were implanted with either a basic miniature defibrillator (ICD) or with a new device carrying insulated wires called leads to transmit signals and electrical impulses to the heart in an effort to stimulate and coordinate the heart to be beating in-sync. This therapy is called cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT).

The study, which followed patients for an average of 40 months, showed that patients with CRT live longer with a reduction of the rate of death. In addition, patients with CRT were less likely to be admitted to hospital for worsening of heart failure.

Until now, no research had been undertaken to examine the specific benefits and survival rates in heart failure patients who have been implanted with a CRT along with an ICD.

"This trial represents a tremendous research success for cardiovascular scientists and demonstrates the importance of clinical evaluative research," said Dr. Alain Beaudet, President of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, which co-funded the research. "We congratulate the Heart Institute for its efforts, which will lead to better health outcomes and longer lives for heart patients."

"Medtronic recognizes the expertise of Canadian electrophysiologists and congratulates them for their leadership in participating and leading this key clinical trial to investigate the benefits of cardiac device therapy in heart failure patients," said Neil Fraser, President of Medtronic of Canada Ltd., which also co-funded the research. "This trial demonstrates that a broader population of heart failure patients could benefit from our therapies, including those with mild symptoms, and they should receive them."

About UOHI

The University of Ottawa Heart Institute is Canada's largest and foremost cardiovascular health centre dedicated to understanding, treating and preventing heart disease. We deliver high-tech care with a personal touch, shape the way cardiovascular medicine is practiced, and revolutionize cardiac treatment and understanding. We build knowledge through research and translate discoveries into advanced care. We serve the local, national and international community, and are pioneering a new era in heart health. For more information, visit www.ottawaheart.ca

For further information please contact:
Marlene Orton
Senior Manager, Public Affairs
University of Ottawa Heart Institute
613-761-4427
mobile: 613-599-6760
morton@ottawaheart.ca

Marlene Orton | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ottawaheart.ca

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