Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Synchronizing a failing heart

15.11.2010
New hope and proven help for heart failure patients: International study proves medical device therapy to boosts a fading heart beat

One of the largest, most extensive worldwide investigations into heart failure, led by the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI), conclusively proves that a new therapeutic implant synchronizes and strengthens a fading heart beat while reducing risk of death by 24% compared to the current treatment.

The research, co-led by Dr. Anthony Tang and Dr. George Wells at the Heart Institute, brings the promise of life-saving treatment for patients with symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure – an increasingly common condition among an aging population that can lead to sudden cardiac death. Each year, more than 500,000 Canadians and five million Americans suffer heart failure.

"This kind of device brings the potential to save thousands of lives in Canada alone and offers new hope to so many heart patients and their families. Helping the lower chambers of the heart beat strongly and in unison can improve a person's quality of life, keep them out of hospital longer and reduce their risk of sudden death," said Dr. Tang.

Results of the clinical trial, which got under way in 2003, were published online today in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (www.NJEM.org) and coincided with the release of the Heart Institute analysis at the Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association in Chicago. The research represents one of the largest international medical device trials undertaken in 2003, comprising 1,798 patients in 24 centres in Canada, Australia, Europe and Turkey.

The Ottawa team consisted largely of top electrophysiologists – cardiologists specializing in surgical procedures to regulate a faulty heart rhythm. Heart failure patients were implanted with either a basic miniature defibrillator (ICD) or with a new device carrying insulated wires called leads to transmit signals and electrical impulses to the heart in an effort to stimulate and coordinate the heart to be beating in-sync. This therapy is called cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT).

The study, which followed patients for an average of 40 months, showed that patients with CRT live longer with a reduction of the rate of death. In addition, patients with CRT were less likely to be admitted to hospital for worsening of heart failure.

Until now, no research had been undertaken to examine the specific benefits and survival rates in heart failure patients who have been implanted with a CRT along with an ICD.

"This trial represents a tremendous research success for cardiovascular scientists and demonstrates the importance of clinical evaluative research," said Dr. Alain Beaudet, President of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, which co-funded the research. "We congratulate the Heart Institute for its efforts, which will lead to better health outcomes and longer lives for heart patients."

"Medtronic recognizes the expertise of Canadian electrophysiologists and congratulates them for their leadership in participating and leading this key clinical trial to investigate the benefits of cardiac device therapy in heart failure patients," said Neil Fraser, President of Medtronic of Canada Ltd., which also co-funded the research. "This trial demonstrates that a broader population of heart failure patients could benefit from our therapies, including those with mild symptoms, and they should receive them."

About UOHI

The University of Ottawa Heart Institute is Canada's largest and foremost cardiovascular health centre dedicated to understanding, treating and preventing heart disease. We deliver high-tech care with a personal touch, shape the way cardiovascular medicine is practiced, and revolutionize cardiac treatment and understanding. We build knowledge through research and translate discoveries into advanced care. We serve the local, national and international community, and are pioneering a new era in heart health. For more information, visit www.ottawaheart.ca

For further information please contact:
Marlene Orton
Senior Manager, Public Affairs
University of Ottawa Heart Institute
613-761-4427
mobile: 613-599-6760
morton@ottawaheart.ca

Marlene Orton | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ottawaheart.ca

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>