Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

From Subways to Dairy Barns, Is New York Ready for Climate Change?

19.09.2011
From snowfall in the Catskills that supply drinking water to ocean temperatures offshore that feed powerful hurricanes, climate change is happening and it will change how New Yorkers live, work and play.

The only question is, will we be ready?

Climate change researcher David W. Wolfe says New York can be prepared, but we need to understand the changes to come and start getting ready to face them today.

Wolfe, a professor of plant and soil ecology at Cornell University and climate change advisor for The New York Botanical Garden, is one of the world’s leading experts on the challenges facing food crops, landscapes and ecosystems. A climate change researcher since 1990 and leader of the climate change team at Cornell’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, Wolfe is one of the leaders of a multi-university team brought together by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to study how shifting weather patterns will affect everything from food and drinking water to energy supplies, subway lines and coastal flooding.

On Tuesday, Sept. 20, at Cornell’s ILR Conference Center in Midtown, Wolfe will talk about the wide range of changes researchers see in New York’s future and what work on the upcoming NYSERDA report has taught him about how we’ll weather the storm.

About Inside Cornell: This event is part of a monthly series held in New York City featuring high-interest experts working at Cornell University's centers in Ithaca, Manhattan and around the world. The free, catered lunch sessions are on-the-record, and media members are welcome to record video and audio as desired.

Contact the Press Relations Office for information about Cornell's TV and radio studios.

WHAT: David W. Wolfe, professor of plant and soil ecology and co-author of the upcoming NYSERDA study focused on preparing New York for climate change, talks about the security of food, water and city subways at the next Inside Cornell media luncheon.

WHEN: Tuesday, Sept. 20, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

WHERE: Cornell’s ILR Conference Center, sixth floor, 16 E. 34th St., Manhattan.

MEDIA NOTE: Journalists are invited to attend this lunch with David Wolfe. To RSVP, please contact John Carberry at (607) 255-5353 or (607) 227-0767, or by e-mail at johncarberry@cornell.edu.

John Carberry | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.cornell.edu

Further reports about: Climate change Conference ILR NYSERDA food crop subways

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

nachricht Europe’s Demographic Future. Where the Regions Are Heading after a Decade of Crises
10.08.2017 | Berlin-Institut für Bevölkerung und Entwicklung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Molecular Force Sensors

20.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Producing electricity during flight

20.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

20.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>