Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study suggests new way of preventing diabetes-associated blindness

26.05.2015

Reporting on their study with lab-grown human cells, researchers at The Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland say that blocking a second blood vessel growth protein, along with one that is already well-known, could offer a new way to treat and prevent a blinding eye disease caused by diabetes.

A summary of the study appears online May 25 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


This image shows the blood vessels in the retina of a patient with proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

Credit: Wilmer Photography

The disease, diabetic retinopathy , is the most common cause of vision loss in working-age adults in the United States. Diabetic eye disease occurs when the normal blood vessels in the eye are replaced over time with abnormal, leaky, fragile blood vessels that leak fluid or bleed into the eye, damaging the light-sensitive retina and causing blindness. Forty to 45 percent of Americans with diabetes have diabetic retinopathy, according to the National Eye Institute.

Laser-sealing eye blood vessels can save central vision, but this often sacrifices peripheral and night vision, according to Akrit Sodhi, M.D., Ph.D. , an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Several recently developed drugs -- bevacizumab, ranibizumab and aflibercept -- can help treat these blood vessels by blocking the action of VEGF, a so-called growth factor released as part of a chain of signals in response to low oxygen levels, which stimulates the growth of new, often abnormal, blood vessels. But studies have shown that although these drugs slow progression to proliferative diabetic retinopathy, it does not reliably prevent it.

Looking for an explanation, postdoctoral fellow Savalan Babapoor-Farrokhran, M.D., and Kathleen Jee, a student at the school of medicine who will begin her residency in ophthalmology at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins next year, tested levels of VEGF in samples of fluid from the eye taken from healthy people, people with diabetes who did not have diabetic retinopathy and people with diabetic retinopathy of varying severity.

While levels of VEGF tended to be higher in those with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, some of their fluid had less VEGF than did the healthy participants. But even the low-VEGF fluid from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy stimulated blood vessel growth in lab-grown cells.

"The results suggested to us that although VEFG clearly plays an important role in blood vessel growth, it's not the only factor," Sodhi says.

A series of experiments in lab-grown human cells and mice revealed a second culprit, a protein called angiopoietin-like 4. When the researchers blocked the action of both VEGF and angiopoietin-like 4 in fluid from the eyes of people with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, it markedly reduced blood vessel growth in lab-grown cells.

If a drug can be found that safely blocks the second protein's action in patients' eyes, it might be combined with the anti-VEGF drugs to prevent many cases of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, Sodhi suggests.

The team is now investigating whether angiopoietin-like 4 might also play a role in other eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, which destroys the central portion of the retina.

###

Other authors on the paper are Brooks Puchner, Syed Junaid Hassan, Xiaoban Xin, Murilo Rodrigues, Fabiana Kashiwabuchi, Ke Hu, Monika Deshpande, Yassine Daoud, Sharon Solomon, Adam Wenick, Gerard Lutty and Gregg L. Semenza, all of The Johns Hopkins University; and Tao Ma and Silvia Montaner of the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

Media Contact

Shawna Williams
shawna@jhmi.edu
410-955-8236

 @HopkinsMedicine

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org 

Shawna Williams | EurekAlert!

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

Im Focus: Quantum-physical Model System

Computer-assisted methods aid Heidelberg physicists in reproducing experiment with ultracold atoms

Two researchers at Heidelberg University have developed a model system that enables a better understanding of the processes in a quantum-physical experiment...

Im Focus: Glacier bacteria’s contribution to carbon cycling

Glaciers might seem rather inhospitable environments. However, they are home to a diverse and vibrant microbial community. It’s becoming increasingly clear that they play a bigger role in the carbon cycle than previously thought.

A new study, now published in the journal Nature Geoscience, shows how microbial communities in melting glaciers contribute to the Earth’s carbon cycle, a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New quantum liquid crystals may play role in future of computers

21.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A promising target for kidney fibrosis

21.04.2017 | Health and Medicine

Light rays from a supernova bent by the curvature of space-time around a galaxy

21.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>