Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Study suggests gender does not play a role in risk of death from heart attack

University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center leads study showing women are older, sicker at the time of treatment for heart attack

A study led by the University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center shows being a woman may not increase your risk of dying from treatment for a severe heart attack.

U-M researchers and colleagues in the Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium found women who received treatment such as an angioplasty had higher unadjusted in-hospital heart attack deaths.

But these differences appear to be related to women's ages and additional health problems – not gender, says study lead author Elizabeth Jackson, M.D., M.P.H., an assistant professor of internal medicine at the U-M Health System and member of the Women's Heart Program.

"When we adjusted for factors such as age and co-morbidities like hypertension and diabetes, women had similar mortality rates at the time of the heart attack as men," says Jackson.

"But women still appear to be more likely to have a bleeding episode in the hospital that requires a transfusion or vascular complications," she says.

The five-year study published in the American Heart Journal showed that compared with men, women were older with more co-morbidities – a medical condition in addition to the primary disease – at the time of treatment.

Women account for about one-third of patients who undergo procedures such as percutaneous coronary interventions to clear the clogged arteries causing a heart attack.

Researchers examined the outcomes of 8,771 patients undergoing a procedure for an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction, commonly known as a severe heart attack. Patients were part of the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan Cardiovascular Consortium registry, a physician-led quality improvement collaborative that is supported by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan and Blue Care Network.

Previous investigations using other registries have found women had higher in-hospital mortality rates than men, but recent advancements in treatment changed how doctors care for these patients and the team wanted to re-investigate with more current data, says Jackson.

"Overall, there have been tremendous improvements in the care of both men and women who suffer a heart attack, but further research on everyday patients, such as those in the registry, is needed to be able to continue improving our level of care," says Jackson.

Cardiovascular disease kills nearly twice as many women in the United States than all types of cancer, including breast cancer, according to the American Heart Association.

February is American Heart Month and several initiatives – such as the American Heart Association's annual National Wear Red Day and the new "Make the Call, Don't Miss a Beat" campaign by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and its Office on Women's Health – aim to bring national attention to women's heart disease.

Also this month, the American Heart Association released its updated guidelines on preventing cardiovascular disease in women and Jackson served on an expert panel that reviewed research and recommended changes.

The Cardiovascular Consortium, called BMC2, is a collaborative network of physicians at 32 Michigan hospitals that perform percutaneous coronary intervention, such as angioplasty and stents to treat patients with coronary artery diseases.

The University of Michigan has been the coordinating center for the statewide BMC2 consortium since 1997.

Additional U-M authors: Dean E. Smith, Ph.D., M.P.H.; David Share, M.D.; Paul M. Grossman, M.D.; Hitinder S. Gurm, M.D.

Other authors: Mauro Moscucci, M.D., M.B.A., University of Miami; Simon Dixon, M.B.Ch.B., William Beaumont Hospital; Adam Greenbaum, M.D., Henry Ford Hospital

Journal reference: American Heart Journal, DOI:10.1016/j.ahj.2010.09.030

Funding: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan

Disclosures: Hitinder S. Gurm receives salary support from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. David Share is employed part time by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. Mauro Moscucci has received salary support from the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. None of the authors have any conflicts relevant to this study.

U-M Cardiovascular Center
American Heart Association
Blue Cross Blue Shield Cardiovascular Consortium (BMC2)
Written by Heather Guenther

Heather Guenther | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Diagnoses: When Are Several Opinions Better Than One?
19.07.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht High in calories and low in nutrients when adolescents share pictures of food online
07.04.2016 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Oasis of life in the ice-covered central Arctic

24.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

‘Farming’ bacteria to boost growth in the oceans

24.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

24.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>