Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study shows image fusion-guided biopsy improves accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis

22.05.2014

A recent study by investigators from LIJ Medical Center demonstrated that using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in men with an elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) resulted in a prostate cancer detection rate that was twice as high as data reported in the March 1999 Prostate journal that analyzed men undergoing the standard 12-core biopsy with an elevated PSA. Physicians in the recent trial used a targeted approach to evaluate prostate cancer that combines MR imaging and transrectal ultrasound fusion guided prostate biopsy.

Given the limitations of the PSA blood test and the standard 12-core ultrasound biopsies for detecting prostate cancer, researchers evaluated the initial 105 men eligible for the clinical trial using a new targeted prostate fusion biopsy method.

The study, which will appear in the June issue of the Journal of Urology, showed that prostate cancer was detected in 62 percent of men tested in the latest trial vs. 30 percent in the general population as reported in the 1999 Prostate journal.

"The results of the phase III clinical trial show that a target fusion biopsy detects more clinically significant prostate cancer," said Art Rastinehad, DO, principal investigator of the study and director of interventonal urologic oncology at North Shore-LIJ's Arthur Smith Institute for Urology, in New Hyde Park, NY. "This is the type of cancer that patients may benefit from treatment compared to other patients with low grade and low volume prostate cancer."

Investigators used the UroNav system, which combines MRI and ultrasound imaging to better identify areas not revealed by the standard, 12-core biopsy procedure. A field generator, similar to a GPS device, is placed over the patient's hip to guide the biopsy. The MRI and ultrasound images are overlaid in real-time, which provide an evaluation of 100 percent of the prostate gland to get the most accurate diagnosis possible.

"The study also showed that in situations when the 12-core biopsy did not detect cancer, the fusion biopsy detected cancer in 15 percent of cases and in these cases, 85 percent were clinically significant," Dr. Rastinehad said.

Dr. Rastinehad credits the quality of the multiparametric prostate MR imaging as one of the key factors in the outcomes of the study, which resulted in excellent prostate cancer detection rates as compared to data from other institutions using the fusion biopsy technology.

"The MRI creates the road map to target specific areas within the prostate," Dr Rastinehad said. "Some patients with previous multiple negative prostate biopsies have cancer outside the usual areas sampled on the standard biopsy so the new technology takes away the mystery of a diagnosis."

Dr. Rastinehad noted the challenge in the study was trying to reproduce the high quality MRI results the National Institutes of Health has established, extending thanks for researches there for assistance in LIJ's research.

"Our study results are very promising," Dr. Rastinehad. "There is no question that a targeted approach will yield more cancer and actually more clinical significant cancer. Our next challenge is to perform a randonmized control trial to see if MR imaging for screening combined with a fusion biopsy can be applied to the broader patient population."

###

To view the abstract: "Improving Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer: Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Guided Prostate Biopsy."

A copy of the study is available is available on request.

Acknowledgements: Invivo provided research equipment. NIH Molecular Imaging Program, Urological Oncology Branch and Center for Image Guided Oncology assisted with initial program support.

Betty Olt | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Island MRI Oncology biopsies biopsy diagnosis prostate significant

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance

27.02.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Decoding the genome's cryptic language

27.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>