Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study finds 'Western diet' detrimental to fetal hippocampal tissue transplants

24.04.2012
Researchers interested in determining the direct effects of a high saturated fat and high cholesterol (HFHC) diet on implanted fetal hippocampal tissues have found that in middle-aged laboratory rats the HFHC diet elevated microglial activation and reduced neuronal development.
While the resulting damage was due to an inflammatory response in the central nervous system, they found that the effects of the HFHC diet were alleviated by the interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist IL-1Ra, leading them to conclude that IL-Ra has potential use in neurological disorders involving neuroinflammation.

They published their results in a recent issue of Cell Transplantation (20:10), now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/.

To carry out the study, the researchers transplanted hippocampal grafts from embryonic 18 day-old rats into the anterior eye chambers of 16-month old host animals that were subsequently fed either a normal rat chow diet or a HFHC diet for eight weeks.
"We hypothesized that damage from the HFHC diet is due, at least in part, to an inflammatory response in the periphery that leads to an inflammatory response in the central nervous system," said study corresponding author Dr. Linnea Freeman of the Medical University of South Carolina's Department of Neuroscience. "We also hypothesized that the drug Kineret ®, a common treatment for rheumatoid arthritis based on the IL-1Ra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, might block the inflammatory cascade."

The researchers noted that the intracranial transplantation of fetal neurons, or engineered cell lines, has been proposed as a potential treatment for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, the quality of graft survival in the aged brain has been questioned.

"It is well known that the aged brain poses special challenges for successfully grafting cells," said Dr. Freeman. "The causes for this are unclear, but factors such as the inflammatory response, reduced growth factor production and reduced cellular support systems have been explored."

The researchers grafted developing hippocampal tissue to middle-aged recipient rats knowing that the grafts may be compromised by increased systemic cytokines and that the HFHC diet would be further detrimental.

After six weeks, the researchers found stunted growth in fetal hippocampal tissues among the animals fed the HFHC diet as opposed to normal development in controls receiving a normal diet. However, when treated topically with IL-1Ra, the HFHC fed animals grew grafts three times the size of HFHC-fed, saline-treated controls.

"All factors taken together, the HFHC diet was shown to exert detrimental effects on hippocampal growth and development," explained Dr. Freeman. "Factors contributing to this effect include, but are not limited to, vascularization and inflammation."

The research team concluded that not only was graft growth altered by the HFHC diet, but that neuronal development and organization was affected as well. However, that treatment with IL-1Ra blocked the detrimental effects of the HFHC diet on hippocampal tissues may indicate a potential use for IL-1Ra in neurological disorders involving neuroinflammation.

"Eight weeks on a Westernized high fat high cholesterol diet causes developmental neuroinflammation in middle-aged rats that can be reversed by an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist" said Dr. John Sladek, professor of neurology and pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "It will be interesting to see if the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist is still effective with a long term Westernized diet and whether this can be translated to humans."

Contact: Dr. Linnea Freeman, Department of Neurosciences, Basic Science Building, Suite 411, 173 Ashley Ave. Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, 29425

Email freemal@musc.edu

Citation: Freeman, L. R.; Small, B. J.; Bickford, P. C.; Umphlet, C.; Granholm, A. C. A High Fat/High Cholesterol Diet Inhibits Growth Of Fetal Hippocampal Transplants Via Increased Inflammation. Cell Transplant. 20(10):1499-114; 2011.

The Coeditor-in-chief's for CELL TRANSPLANTATION are at the Center for Neuropsychiatry, China Medical University Hospital, TaiChung, Taiwan, and the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.

Contact, Shinn-Zong Lin, MD, PhD at shinnzong@yahoo.com.tw or Camillo Ricordi, MD at ricordi@miami.edu or David Eve, PhD at celltransplantation@gmail.com

News release by Florida Science Communications www.sciencescribe.net

David Eve | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Drone vs. truck deliveries: Which create less carbon pollution?
31.05.2017 | University of Washington

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Quantum thermometer or optical refrigerator?

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved at EPFL

23.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Equipping form with function

23.06.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>