Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Strobe Eyewear Training Improves Visual Memory

24.07.2012
Stroboscopic training, performing a physical activity while using eyewear that simulates a strobe-like experience, has been found to increase visual short-term memory retention, and the effects lasted 24 hours.

Participants in a Duke University study engaged in physical activities, such as playing catch, while using either specialized eyewear that limits vision to only brief snapshots or while using eyewear with clear lenses that provides uninterrupted vision. Participants completed a computer-based visual memory test before and after the physical activities. Research participants came from the Duke community.

Many were recruited from University-organized sports teams, including varsity-level players. The study found that participants who trained with the strobe eyewear gained a boost in visual memory abilities.

Participants completed a memory test that required them to note the identity of eight letters of the alphabet that were briefly displayed on a computer screen. After a variable delay, participants were asked to recall one of the eight letters. On easy-level trials, the recall prompt came immediately after the letters disappeared, but on more difficult trials, the prompt came as late as 2.5 seconds following the display. Because participants did not know which letter they would be asked to recall, they had to retain all of the items in memory.

“Humans have a memory buffer in their brain that keeps information alive for a certain short-lived period,” said Greg Appelbaum, assistant professor of psychiatry at Duke University and first author of the study. “Wearing the strobe eyewear during the physical training seemed to boost the ability to retain information in this buffer.”

The strobe eyewear disrupts vision by only allowing the user to see glimpses of the world. The user must adjust their visual processing in order to perform normally, and this adjustment produces a lingering benefit; once participants removed the strobe eyewear, there was an observed boost in their visual memory retention, which was found to last 24 hours.

Earlier work by Appelbaum and the project’s senior researcher, Stephen Mitroff, had shown that stroboscopic training improves visual perception, including the ability to detect subtle motion cues and the processing of briefly presented visual information. Yet the earlier study had not determined how long the benefits might last.

“Our earlier work on stroboscopic training showed that it can improve perceptual abilities, but we don’t know exactly how,” says Mitroff, associate professor of psychology & neuroscience and member of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. “This project takes a big step by showing that these improved perceptual abilities are driven, at least in part, by improvements in visual memory.”

“Improving human cognition is an important goal with so many benefits,” said Appelbaum, also a member of the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences. “Interestingly, our findings demonstrate one way in which visual experience has the capacity to improve cognition.”

Participants for the study came from the 2010-2011 Duke University men’s and women’s varsity soccer teams, Duke’s 2010-2011 men’s basketball team and members of the general Duke community. Mitroff reported that participants had little or no trouble with the stroboscopic training, and several participants later returned to inquire about how they could be involved as research assistants.

The research was supported by Nike SPARQ Sensory Performance, who designed the eyewear and is marketing it as Nike SPARQ Vapor Strobe. The study appears online July 19 in Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics.

CITATION – “Stroboscopic visual training improves information encoding in short-term memory,” L. Gregory Appelbaum, Matthew S. Cain, Julia E. Schroeder, Elise F. Darling, and Stephen R. Mitroff, Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, July 2012. DOI 10.3758/s13414-012-0344-6

Julie Rhodes | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.duke.edu
http://dibs.duke.edu/news/press-releases/2012/07/23/strobe-eyewear-training-improves-visual-memory/

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht A sudden drop in outdoor temperature increases the risk of respiratory infections
11.01.2017 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>