Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Stem Cells and ABC Transporters Essential in Kidney Regeneration

28.01.2009
In a study funded by the Dutch Kidney Foundation (DKF) a research group at Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre in the Netherlands, found that stem cells and ABC transporter proteins are indispensable for tubular regeneration after acute kidney injury (Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 2009 Jan; 328(1):3-9. Epub 2008 Sep 12).

Said project leader Dr. Rosalinde Masereeuw: 'To our surprise, our knockout mice for the ABC transporters P-gp and BCRP, P-gycoprotein and breast cancer resistance protein, were protected against acute kidney damage.

This was the opposite of what we expected since the transporters usually have a protective function in excreting potentially toxic compounds, while these mice lack expression. Moreover, when we cross transplanted bone marrow between normal mice and the knockouts it turned out that bone marrow from the knockouts was the source of protection.'

Regeneration
Acute kidney injury is an important cause for the need of acute hemodialysis and a source of kidney failure. On the other hand, the kidney has a remarkable capacity for recovery. Stem cells seemed to have a limited share in the repair process, but now this study suggests otherwise.

'It was known that stem cells from the bone marrow express P-gp and BCRP abundantly but will downregulate them at differentiation. Repair of tubular damage in the kidney depends primarily on local cells but stem cells are involved as well. Further, we observed an upregulation in the expression of the transporters during ischemic injury. .So we thought they might be important in renal regeneration.'

Transporter Proteins
ABC transporters (ATP binding cassette transporters) form a superfamily of highly conserved transporter proteins whose functions are not yet well understood. However, BCRP and especially P-gp have been studied in more detail in man. These cell membrane pumps are responsible for the transport of many substances, for instance drug molecules in the intestine. P-gp plays an important role in drug resistance of tumour cells.

Masereeuw: 'Our new hypothesis claims a bigger role for bone marrow derived stem cells in kidney regeneration. A possible mechanism is the infiltration of macrophages. These large immune cells have subgroups one of which increases damage but another supports tissue regeneration.'

Also, the study showed that mice without P-gp expression lose renal tubular function in a way comparable to Fanconi syndrome in man. BCRP knockouts, on the other hand, have a normal kidney function.

Blocking P-gp and BCRP
There is a great need for novel therapies that limit kidney damage after acute injury by toxic substances or shortage of oxygen, as in transplant kidneys which have no blood supply during transport. The results from this DKF study are pointing at inhibition of the transporters in kidney or bone marrow to strengthen the regenerative power of stem cells.

'Next, we will try to discover the mechanism by which stem cells and ABC transporters contribute to kidney repair', concludes Dr. Masereeuw, 'and we will test the effect of transporter blockers in our mouse models. We are convinced there are good opportunities here for new drug targets.'

Arjen Rienks | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nierstichting.nl

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

nachricht Europe’s Demographic Future. Where the Regions Are Heading after a Decade of Crises
10.08.2017 | Berlin-Institut für Bevölkerung und Entwicklung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary

21.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cnidarians remotely control bacteria

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>