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Sleep quality and duration improve cognition in aging populations

17.06.2014

University of Oregon-led research finds women sleeping longer and struggling with quality

Maybe turning to sleep gadgets -- wristbands, sound therapy and sleep-monitoring smartphone apps -- is a good idea. A new University of Oregon-led study of middle-aged or older people who get six to nine hours of sleep a night think better than those sleeping fewer or more hours.


University of Oregon doctoral student Theresa E. Gildner led a study, supported by the NIH, that looked at sleep quality and duration, and the impacts of both on health. The results are the first to emerge from a longitudinal study.

Credit: University of Oregon

The study, published in the June issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, reaffirms numerous small-scale studies in the United States, Western Europe and Japan, but it does so using data compiled across six middle-income nations and involving more than 30,000 subjects for a long-term project that began in 2007.

"We wanted to look at aging, particularly dementia and cognitive decline as people get older, and the importance of sleep. Our results provide compelling evidence that sleep matters a lot," said lead author Theresa E. Gildner, a doctoral student in the UO's anthropology department. "In all six countries, which are very different culturally, economically and environmentally -- despite all these differences -- you see similar patterns emerging."

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Video Overview of Project and Study: http://youtu.be/5wx-aZLY5W4

The study, based on the first wave of data from a continuing long-term project, focuses on people 50 years old and older in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, the Russian Federation and South Africa. Among the key findings were:

  • Men reported higher sleep quality than women in all six nations, with men and women in Mexico reporting the highest. 

     

  • Women reported longer sleep durations than men in all countries except Russia and Mexico. Men and women in South Africa slept longer than in any other country. The least sleep hours for both sexes occurred in India.

     

  • Individuals sleeping less than six hours and more than nine hours had significantly lower cognitive scores compared to those in the intermediate group.

The study concludes that the findings have important implications for future intervention strategies for dementia. The consistent associations between intermediate sleep durations, high sleep quality and enhanced cognitive performance in these diverse populations suggests that improving sleep patterns may help reduce the level of cognitive decline as seen in older adults.

Another important finding, Gildner said, is the gender difference in all sleep and cognition variables. Citing previous studies, the authors hypothesized that women's sleep patterns reflect postmenopausal changes, increased bladder instability and feelings of isolation after the loss of a spouse or lack of social support. Cognition scores of women may result from their sleep difficulties and/or lower educational levels.

The growing database in the long-term study, known as the Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE), is allowing researchers to mine many combinations of variables connected to health and lifestyle, said J. Josh Snodgrass, professor of anthropology at the UO. "It also will allow anthropologists to explore cultural factors that may contribute to sleeping and health patterns."

Snodgrass is a key investigator on SAGE, which is funded by a joint agreement of the National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization.

"This study is hugely powerful and so different from what's been done in the past, simply because of the consistency of how the data was collected -- multi-national, random samples of people," he said. "Sleep is something that is important but often undervalued in our society.

"From doing this research and being familiar with the literature," he added, "an emphasis on sleep issues by the media in recent years is warranted. Every single piece of evidence that people look at now as they are investigating sleep and different health associations is all showing that sleep really, really, really matters. We're just now scratching the surface on what patterns of sleep normally are, and also what are these associations between sleep and health issues."

###

Co-authors with Gildner and Snodgrass were: UO doctoral student Melissa A. Liebert, anthropology; Paul Kowal of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland, and University of Newcastle Research Centre on Gender, Health, and Aging in Australia; and Dr. Somnath Chatterji of the World Health Organization.

Funding for the joint NIH-WHO agreement comes from the NIH National Institute on Aging (YA1323-08-CN-0020). An additional NIH grant (RO1-AG034479) also supports the project, which will continue to track a variety of changes among the participants over time.

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

Sources: Theresa E. Gildner, doctoral student, biological anthropology, 541-346-5109, tgildner@uoregon.edu, and J. Josh Snodgrass, associate professor of anthropology, 541-346-4823, jjosh@uoregon.edu

Jim Barlow | Eurek Alert!
Further information:
http://www.uoregon.edu

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