Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Severe complications of diabetes higher in depressed patients

28.01.2010
Such complications include kidney failure, blindness, heart attack and stroke

Depression raises risks of advanced and severe complications from diabetes, according to a prospective study of Group Health primary-care patients in western Washington. These complications include kidney failure or blindness, the result of small vessel damage, as well as major vessel problems leading to heart attack or stroke.

The findings were published this week in Diabetes Care, a scientific journal of the American Diabetes Association. The study was conducted by scientists from the Group Health Research Institute, Seattle; the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine and School of Public Health, and the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System. The lead author is Dr. Elizabeth Lin of the Group Health Research Institute.

Among their research volunteers with type 2 diabetes followed over 5 years, major depression was associated with a 36 percent higher risk of developing advanced micro-vascular complications, such as end-stage kidney disease or blindness, and a 25 percent higher risk of developing advanced macrovascular complications, such as stroke or myocardial infarction (heart attack from a blood clot), compared with diabetes patients without depression. The clinically significant risks remained even after the researchers adjusted for diabetes severity and self-care activities.

Between 2000 and 2002, the Pathways Epidemiological Follow-up Study enrolled 4,632 primary-care Group Health Cooperative patients with diabetes. These patients were tracked through 2005-2007. The final sample size was 3,723. The researchers reviewed medical records, diagnostic and procedural codes, lists of prescribed medications, and death certificates to determine what happened to each patient over nearly five years. The researchers used proportional hazard models to calculate the association between depression and the risk of advanced complications. Even among patients with diabetes who had no prior indication of microvascular or macrovascular problems, depression increased the chances that these problems would develop.

As in earlier reports, the diabetes patients with major depression tended to be slightly younger, heavier, have more co-existing medical conditions, and were more likely to be treated with insulin than were diabetes patients without depression. They also had higher levels of a substance in the blood formed when the sugar glucose attaches to hemoglobin, an oxygen-carrying protein. The major depression group had a higher proportion of women and smokers. However, after controlling for these differences between depressed and non-depressed patients with diabetes, the increased risk of complications associated with depression remained.

Several previous studies suggest the negative relationship between depression and diabetes cuts both ways. People with depression are prone to diabetes, and vice versa. Impairment from diabetes, such as blindness or kidney failure requiring long-term dialysis, interferes with a person's daily life and can be overwhelming. The person may become depressed or an existing depression may worsen.

As the incidence of type 2 diabetes soars, the clinical and public health significance of these findings increases, the authors noted. Further research is needed, the authors added, to clarify the underlying biological mechanism for the association between depression and complications of diabetes, and to test interventions which might be effective in lowering the risk of complications among patients who have both diabetes and depression.

In addition to Lin, the researchers on the study were Dr. Carolyn M. Rutter, Malia Oliver, Dr. Evette Ludman, Dr. David McCulloch and Dr. Michael Van Korff of the Group Health Research Institute in Seattle; Dr. Wayne Katon and Dr. Paul Ciechanowski, both of the UW Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Dr. Susan Heckbert of the Cardiovascular Research Unit, UW Department of Epidemiology; Dr. Bessie Young of the Epidemiologic Research Information Center at the Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System and the UW School of Medicine; and Dr. Lisa Williams of the Division of Dermatology, UW Department of Medicine.

Grants from the National Institutes of Health supported the research.

Leila Gray | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.washington.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Electrode materials from the microwave oven

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

New material for digital memories of the future

19.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Physics boosts artificial intelligence methods

19.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>