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Chewing gum may help reduce cravings and control appetite

24.10.2007
New research shows chewing gum may help reduce cravings and control appetite

WHAT: A research study to be presented at the 2007 Annual Scientific Meeting of The Obesity Society, found that chewing gum before an afternoon snack helped reduce hunger, diminish cravings and promote fullness among individuals who limit their overall calorie intake. Calorie intake from snacks was significantly reduced by 25 calories.

Overall, this study demonstrates the benefits of chewing gum and highlights the potential role of chewing gum in appetite control and weight management. Nutritionists say that even small changes in calories can have an impact in the long term. This research study supports the role of chewing gum as an easy, practical tool for weight management.

WHO: Marion Hetherington, D.Phil., Professor of Biopsychology, Glasgow Caledonian University in Glasgow, Scotland led the research study and can discuss the potential role of chewing gum on appetite control.

Gilbert Leveille, Ph.D., Executive Director, Wrigley Science Institute, will also be available to discuss study findings and research on the benefits of chewing gum related to weight management and other areas including oral health, stress relief, and focus, alertness and concentration.

WHEN: Study to be presented as a poster on Monday, October 22, 5:30 p.m. CST; Hall G – Level 1, Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, New Orleans, La.

STUDY BACKGROUND: In the 60-person study, participants aged 18 to 54 were asked to consume a sweet and salty afternoon snack after chewing a sweetened gum or not chewing gum. Hunger, appetite and cravings were rated immediately after lunch, and then hourly.

Chewing gum significantly reduced caloric intake by 25 calories and specifically reduced sweet snack intake by 39 calories; salty snacks were decreased by 11 calories.

Hunger and desire to eat were significantly suppressed by chewing gum at one, two and three hour intervals after lunch.

Participants reported that chewing gum improved their mood by reducing anxiety and stress, and increasing contentment and relaxation.

In a similar study among individuals not actively trying to manage their weight, chewing gum reduced snack intake by average of 36 calories.

Data combined from both studies found that chewing gum reduced intake of the sweet snack in particular by an average of 47 calories.

WRIGLEY SCIENCE INSTITUTE AWARDS:

As part of its commitment to advancing and sharing scientific research that explores the benefits of chewing gum, this year, the Wrigley Science Institute (WSI) will award its first two $25,000 grants to further examine the impact of chewing gum on food intake, regulation of appetite and diet, weight loss and/or prevention of weight gain.

The WSI will also award two grants through The Obesity Society in 2008 and will announce an official call for proposals early next year.

Samantha Kaplan | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.edelman.com

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