Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Septic survival: Boys with blood infection suffer more severely than girls

18.10.2007
While survival rates for sepsis have increased over the past two decades, children under four and those in adolescence remain highly susceptible to the condition. Researchers in The Netherlands have now demonstrated that age and to a lesser extent, gender, are critical factors in whether or not a child sufferer will develop a more severe disease state and survive or not. These findings could help to improve the treatment of sepsis and improve survival rates further still.

Writing in the online open access journal Critical Care, Jan Hazelzet and colleagues at the Erasmus MC-Sophia Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) in Rotterdam describe their study of almost 300 children admitted with sepsis and purpura (red patches caused by bleeding under the skin) between 1988 and 2006. The researchers recorded the age, gender, ethnic origin, severity of condition, therapy, and survival of the patients. They then pooled the data and analyzed the outcomes retrospectively.

The results showed that the fatality rate from sepsis and purpura was 15.7%. However, during the study period, they observed a marked improvement in the numbers of children surviving sepsis. Nevertheless, they found that younger children were affected more severely and fatality rate was higher (4.3 times) for those under the age of three years. They found no difference in fatality rates between boys and girls, but boys were admitted to the PICU for longer periods and had more severe symptoms. The team found that the course of sepsis and purpura was not related to a child's ethnic origin.

In almost all cases, the infection that led to sepsis was Neisseria meningitidis, the bacterium commonly known as meningococcus. The team also reports how the drugs used to treat sepsis changed during the course of the study. There has been a marked reduction in the use of dopamine and a concomitant increase in the use of dobutamine, norepinephrine and corticosteroids to treat sepsis. "The finding of the important influence of young age and to a lesser extent gender can lead to a better understanding of the disease, which in turn can lead to better therapy", says Jan Hazelzet.

Sepsis is a serious medical condition triggered by infection, which leads to body-wide inflammation, fever, increased pulse and breathing, and potentially organ failure and death. Each year, more than 750,000 people in the USA will develop severe sepsis, and more than 215,000 will die from the condition. In the UK, sepsis kills around 30,000 people annually.

Charlotte Webber | alfa
Further information:
http://ccforum.com/
http://www.biomedcentral.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>