Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Prostate cancer increases hip fracture risk by eight times in 50 to 65 year-olds

12.10.2007
Men who have prostate cancer are on average four times more likely to suffer a hip fracture, with rates rising to eight times in men aged 50 to 65, according to a study of more than 60,000 men published in the October issue of the urology journal BJU International.

Danish researchers looked at 62,865 men aged 50 and over, with an average age of just under 67.

15,716 had suffered a fracture of some description and 47,149 formed the non-fracture control group.

They discovered that prostate cancer made men 1.8 times more likely overall to suffer a fracture and 3.7 times as likely to suffer from a hip fracture. But the hip fracture risk was eight times higher in men from 50 to 65 years of age. No increased risk of vertebral fractures was found by the research.

“Our study showed that more than three per cent of hip fractures in men aged 50 and over can be attributed to prostate cancer” says lead researcher Dr Bo Abrahamsen from Copenhagen University Hospital, Gentofte. “And the risk remains even when men have recovered from the disease.”

The researchers - urologists and endocrinologists from Danish hospitals attached to the University of Southern Denmark and Copenhagen University - now plan to establish a multi-centre initiative focussing on the early diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in men with prostate cancer.

“Prostate cancer is now the cancer that men are most likely to develop and is a leading cause of male deaths in Europe and the USA” stresses Dr Abrahamsen.

“American research has also shown that men have a 17 per cent chance of prostate cancer during their lifetime. And Danish research has discovered that deaths from the disease have more than tripled since the Second World War.

“Medical advances are improving survival rates, but the downside is that treatment can lead to osteoporosis, where the bone loses density and becomes more fragile. This is turn increases the risk of fractures.”

The researchers used data from the Danish National Hospital Discharge Register, the National Bureau of Statistics and the National Prescription Database to identify patients aged 50 and over who had suffered a fracture. They then used the same data to identify an age-matched control group.

“Our research showed that the increased fracture risk became apparent in the early stages after diagnosis and remained pronounced even in long-term survivors” says Steen Walter, Professor of Urology at Odense University Hospital.

“Men who received hormone therapy (ADT) or had their testicles surgically removed to slow the progression of the disease were 1.7 times more likely to suffer a fracture.”

The authors point out that the research only covered the 15 per cent of ADT doses issued on prescription. The majority of the doses are issued by hospital departments, which means they cannot be traced to individual patients. So the actual impact of ADT on national fracture levels could be even greater.

Other issues were also found to lead to increased fracture rates.

“The study showed that the men in the fracture group were almost three times as likely as the control group to have suffered a previous fracture. They were also more likely to live alone and be in a lower income group” says Dr Abrahamsen.

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.bjui.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Start codons in DNA may be more numerous than previously thought

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Warming ponds could accelerate climate change

21.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>