Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A study reveals that immigrant teenagers eat better and have a lower risk of obesity than Spanish teenagers.

04.10.2007
According to a study carried out at the Department of Experimental Sciences of the University of Granada, immigrant teenagers eat better than Spanish teenagers.

For this reason, immigrant teenagers have a lower probability of suffering from obesity, diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases caused by bad eating habits.

The study has not only analysed for the first time the habits and attitudes of immigrants towards nutrition, but it also has pointed out that interculturality applied to the eating field improves teenagers’ health.

Lorena Ramos Chamorro is the author of this study, which has been directed by professors José Antonio Naranjo Rodríguez and Francisco González García. Lorena Ramos Chamorro has carried out more than 800 surveys among Spanish and immigrant teenagers in the Basque Country and Castille and Leon. Results of her research have shown that the eating habits of immigrants are much better than those of the Spanish, since they eat more fruit, vegetables, cereals and natural juice than Spanish teenagers. The research also concludes that immigrants eat fewer snacks and sweets. On the other hand, Spanish teenagers drink a higher amount of milk and are more aware of the importance of having breakfast, since 75% of them eat before going to school, although those immigrants that do eat breakfast eat a more complete one and devote more time to it.

For their part, Spanish girls show the highest level of knowledge about issues related to nutrition. However, paradoxically, if compared to the rest of people analyzed in this research, Spanish girls consume the highest percentage of sweets.

More proteins

The above-mentioned analysis of eating habits has shown that immigrant teenagers studying in Spain – most of them from South America, the Arab Countries, the Baltic Countries and China – eat more proteins than Spanish teenagers. These proteins are contained in food such as quinoa, amaranth, millet, soya or yucca, and sweet potato. Lorena Ramos Chamorro points out that immigrants are more likely to try new foods and to eat something they do not know than Spanish people.

Within the framework of this study, Lorena Ramos Chamorro has designed and implemented a multicultural educational programme based on food and nutrition. This programme has been applied to students of the third year of Compulsory Secondary Education in the IES Cartuja school in Granada. Under the title Alimentación Intercultural. Comer mejor es possible (Intercultural Alimentation, Eating better is possible), “respect and acceptance of differences based on food have been fostered, this fact being the best example of cultural diversity”. In this way, through this initiative students have tasted food and flavours from the countries of origin of their immigrant classmates. Furthermore, “students have shared traditions and customs, allowing immigrants to maintain their identity in spite of cultural differences”. Finally, and according to Lorena Ramos Chamorro, this project “has improved, practically by 100%, students’ eating habits”. She also states that her study has shown that “it is possible to improve coexistence among students and create an educational atmosphere based on equal rights and interculturality”.

Antonio Marín Ruiz | alfa
Further information:
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/research/index.php

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Amputees can learn to control a robotic arm with their minds
28.11.2017 | University of Chicago Medical Center

nachricht The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change
17.11.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

Im Focus: A transistor of graphene nanoribbons

Transistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. An international research team working with Empa has now succeeded in producing nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, as reported in the current issue of the trade journal "Nature Communications."

Graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, so-called graphene nanoribbons, have special electrical properties that make them promising candidates for the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

Blockchain is becoming more important in the energy market

05.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Making fuel out of thick air

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>