Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study finds limiting work hours for surgical residents enhances training

19.09.2007
Although work-hour restrictions may improve well-being of residents, it may make the job harder for faculty members

Contrary to concerns that restricting work hours for surgical residents negatively affects the quality of patient care or the residents’ education, a study in the September issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons found that limiting work hours does not compromise education or the quality of care. In addition, the study found that the new model improved overall teaching effectiveness and increased the amount of operating room experience that residents receive.

However, researchers concluded that duty-hour restrictions could amplify job dissatisfaction and work hours among faculty and necessitate an increase in physician assistant and nurse staffing.

Four years ago, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandated the “Common Duty Hours Standard,” which required a dramatic redesign of the country's resident training programs. Among the key requirements were to limit resident work hours to no more than 80 hours per week averaged over a four-week period, restrict shifts to 30 hours, and permit at least a 10-hour rest period in between shifts. As a result of the mandate, many surgical educators were prompted to rethink their programs' organizational structures to adhere to the new requirements.

"These findings cannot be ignored. In this environment, limits on duty hours require us to reorganize our residency programs to promote high-quality education, safe patient care, and resident well-being and to carefully monitor the results of this reorganization to be sure that all of these requirements are being satisfied," Joseph R. Schneider, MD, FACS and lead author of the study, said.

The study, “Implementation and Evaluation of a New Surgical Residency Model,” which was conducted by the department of surgery at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, involved the four core hospitals that make up the school's McGaw Medical Center. This new model included a mixture of apprenticeship, small team, and night-float models. The study evaluated the impact of their reengineered residency program and scheduling structure.

According to rotation evaluation forms completed by residents, the new program improved resident satisfaction with the quality of the teaching they received on rounds, in conferences, in the clinic and in the operating room. In addition, residents were more satisfied that they met the objectives of their rotations. The study also addressed a widespread concern that shortened resident hours would negatively affect patient care and patient outcomes. The authors found no evidence for deterioration in any patient outcome measures. In fact, continuity of care actually improved and residents were more likely to see patients after the operation as a result of the new system.

“Although duty-hour restrictions did not cause a deterioration of surgical residents' educational experience, these restrictions have the potential to produce new challenges,” added Dr. Schneider. “Faculty surveys showed perceived increases in work hours and job dissatisfaction after implementation of the new program structure. Also, 10 new physician assistant and nurse positions were hired as a result of the duty-hour restrictions.” The department of surgery at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine implemented a new residency program structure on July 1, 2003, to include a mixture of apprenticeship, small team, and night-float models. Before this change was made, the residency program used the traditional team-based approach with call being taken every third or fourth night, depending on the rotation. This study describes the organization of the new program structure and subsequent evaluation findings from measures taken over three years, beginning one year before, and completed two years after, the program implementation.

Sally Garneski | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.facs.org
http://www.facs.org/education/rap/foreword.html

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>