Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

COX-2 inhibitors delay pancreatic cancer precursors in mice

03.08.2007
Nimesulide, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, delays the progression of precancerous pancreatic lesions in mice, according to researchers at David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. While inflammation has been shown to be a factor in many forms of cancer, the researchers say this is the first study to demonstrate the effect of an anti-inflammatory COX-2 inhibitor on the development of pancreatic cancer.

The study, published in the August 1 issue of Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, suggests a potential role for COX-2 inhibitors in pancreatic cancer prevention among high-risk patients. Pancreatic cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in America – over 33,000 Americans will likely die from the disease in 2007, according to projections from the American Cancer Society.

“By inhibiting COX-2 in human patients, we may have an option to delay the progression of lesions,” said lead author Guido Eibl, M.D., scientific director of the Hirshberg Laboratory of Pancreatic Cancer Research and adjunct assistant professor at UCLA .

Researchers believe pancreatic cancer arises from abnormal tissues, or lesions in the pancreas, known as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs). By stalling the growth of PanINs, researchers hope to slow the development of or prevent pancreatic cancer.

COX-2, an enzyme which causes inflammation, is no stranger to cancer researchers. Studies of breast, colon, and pancreatic cancers have led researchers to believe COX-2 plays a key role in the development and growth of tumors.

To study the effects of COX-2 on PanIN progression, Dr. Eibl and colleagues focused on the KrasG12D mouse, an animal model that mimics the early stages of pancreatic cancer. In the KrasG12D mouse, low-grade PanINs (stage I or II) begin to appear in the pancreas of mice at one month. Starting at six months, high-grade PanINs (stage III) can be found in the mouse pancreas. According to Dr. Eibl, most researchers agree that stage III PanINs are a direct precursor to pancreatic cancer in humans as well as mice. Between 12 and 15 months, Dr. Eibl says the majority of KrasG12D mice will develop pancreatic tumors.

The UCLA researchers divided the mice into two groups – one set received a nimesulide-enriched diet for 10 months; the other was offered only regular mouse chow. Their analyses revealed that the nimesulide diet greatly reduced the number of late-stage PanINs in KrasG12D (10 percent of pancreatic ducts had PanIN-2 or -3 in KrasG12D mice on nimesulide diet versus 40 percent of pancreatic ducts had PanIN-2 or -3 in KrasG12D mice on normal diet).

Because the pancreases of mice were analyzed at 10 months, before the typical appearance of pancreatic tumors, additional studies will be needed for researchers to conclude whether or not nimesulide can delay the onset of or prevent pancreatic cancer.

“With these results, I certainly wouldn’t say everyone should be taking COX-2 inhibitors to protect against cancer,” said Eibl. “However, with additional studies, we may find COX-2 inhibitors could help prevent pancreatic cancer in high risk populations.”

“Pancreatic cancer is so deadly because it often goes undetected until it’s too late,” said Dr. Eibl. “If a patient is at a high-risk for developing pancreatic cancer, a COX-2 inhibitor may offer some protection.”

In the future, Dr. Eibl and others plan to study the long-term effects of nimesulide and additional COX-2 inhibitors on the onset and progression of pancreatic cancer.

Greg Lester | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.aacr.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Obstructing the ‘inner eye’
07.07.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Drone vs. truck deliveries: Which create less carbon pollution?
31.05.2017 | University of Washington

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>