Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study confirms that NSAIDs treatment can reduce colorectal cancer risk

24.07.2007
Safer drugs needed before regular preventive therapy can be recommended

A study of Medicare patients with osteoarthritis provides additional evidence that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. Earlier investigations of the drugs’ impact on tumor development could not rule out the possibility that an observed protective effect was caused by other preventive health care measures. The current study, led by a Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) physician, appears in the August 2007 Journal of General Internal Medicine.

“This is good news for people who take NSAIDs regularly for osteoarthritis,” says Elizabeth Lamont, MD, MS, of the MGH Cancer Center, the study’s lead author. “Although patients face risks such as bleeding or kidney damage from this therapy, they probably are at a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer.” Because of the risks posed by the dosage used to treat osteoarthritis, she and her co-authors stress that currently available NSAIDs should not be used solely to prevent cancer.

Earlier randomized trials clearly showed that NSAID treatment can prevent the development of precancerous colorectal polyps, but whether or not such therapy also reduces the risk of invasive colorectal cancer has not yet been confirmed. Those trials used relatively low doses of aspirin and showed no significant differences in colorectal cancer rates between the aspirin and placebo groups. While many observational studies have shown a protective effect of NSAIDs against colorectal cancer, interpretation of some of those results may have been clouded by other healthy behaviors of the participants.

“It would be ideal to conduct a randomized clinical trial – in which half the patients receive NSAIDs at doses higher than those used in prior trials and half receive placebos – and follow both groups for many years for evidence of cancer. But such trials are expensive, time consuming, and could present real health risks to participants. Therefore, we took advantage of a natural ‘experiment’ by comparing data from patients known to regularly take higher amounts of NSAIDs with that from those taking lower doses in order to evaluate any effect on colorectal cancer risk.”

First the researchers reviewed data from the 1993-94 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, in which physicians report on the diagnoses of and treatments prescribed to patients seen during a randomly selected week. Those results verified that older patients with osteoarthritis were more than four times as likely to take NSAIDs as were those without osteoarthritis. They then analyzed information from the Survival Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare program, studying groups of elderly Medicare patients with and without colorectal cancer, to search for associations with NSAID use.

Comparing information on 4,600 individuals with colorectal cancer to data from 100,000 controls, they found that a history of osteoarthritis was associated with a 15 percent reduction in the likelihood of a colorectal cancer diagnosis. A similar association was seen when total knee replacement was used as a marker for NSAID treatment.

“The magnitude of colorectal cancer risk reduction between patients with and without osteoarthritis is completely consistent with the risk reduction for pre-cancerous polyps reported in clinical trials of NSAIDs,” Lamont says. “Confirming this association supports the need for further research to identify NSAID agents safe enough to be used for regular, preventive therapy by the general population.”

Sue McGreevey | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mgh.harvard.edu/

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

MEMS chips get metatlenses

21.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

International team publishes roadmap to enhance radioresistance for space colonization

21.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

World's first solar fuels reactor for night passes test

21.02.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>