Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study assesses lung treatments for premature babies

09.05.2007
A pig-derived surfactant given to premature babies whose lungs aren’t yet making the lubricant reduces mortality rates by 19 percent over two other commercially-available surfactants, researchers say.

A retrospective study of 24,883 premature babies with respiratory distress syndrome treated in 191 U.S. hospitals from January 2003 to June 2006 showed reduced mortality for all causes in babies given poractant alfa, according to lead researcher Dr. Jatinder Bhatia, chief of the Section of Neonatology at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. “The differences hold true whether you are sitting in a rural hospital or teaching hospital or non-teaching hospital.”

The study was the first to compare all three natural surfactants used in this country to treat babies with respiratory distress syndrome. Previous studies, comparing poractant alfa with calf-derived beractant, have yielded similar results; studies comparing beractant and calfactant, also calf-derived, demonstrated no differences in mortality. The smaller studies prompted researchers to do their more comprehensive review.

Their results are being presented May 7 during the Pediatric Academic Societies Annual Meeting in Toronto.

“We are looking at a large, vulnerable population and we need this kind of data to make informed decisions,” Dr. Bhatia says. He notes that the current analysis doesn’t explain differences in mortality so additional studies might be needed.

About 12.7 percent of babies are born prematurely in the United States annually and about 30,000-40,000 babies have respiratory distress with surfactant deficiency.

“It’s inversely related to gestational age and birth weight: the younger the baby, the higher the percentage of these babies that have little or no surfactant,” says Dr. Bhatia.

Surfactant is a viscous, soapy-like substance that keeps thousands of air sacs inside the lungs from sticking together when they inflate and deflate while breathing. “If you think of the lungs as a million little balloons, these balloons collapse when the baby tries to breathe out and that is why they get into respiratory distress,” says Dr. Bhatia.

Premature lungs don’t immediately produce the essential lubricant, and air sacs are quickly damaged trying to function without it, even with ventilator support.

Neonatologists try to prevent damage by giving surfactant within the first hour after birth to tide the baby over until his own lungs start producing it some 48 hours later, Dr. Bhatia says. Prescribed surfactant will eventually become part of the baby’s endogenous pool.

“We can give surfactant of a similar composition as Mother Nature would have made to help ameliorate the disease process. The basic premise is to give surfactant as early as possible to prevent the baby’s lungs from collapsing. Once they collapse, it takes greater support from the outside to reopen these units,” Dr. Bhatia says.

The surfactant effect is almost instantaneous. In fact, neonatologists are increasingly taking babies off the ventilator at the same time surfactant is given. Prenatal steroids, which accelerate lung maturity, are given to mothers when premature birth is imminent. Lung-sparing measures, such as the lowest possible ventilator setting, also are used.

Pig-derived poractant alfa, a relative newcomer approved by the FDA in 1999, was the least-used surfactant in the study population. Of the 24,883 babies in the data base provided by Charlotte, N.C.-based Premier Inc. 4,953 got poractant alfa, marketed as Curosurf®; 12,653 got beractant marketed as Survanta®; and 7,277 got calfactant, marketed as Infasurf®.

Co-authors on the study included researchers at Women’s and Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles and the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City.

The study was funded by Dey, L.P. and Chiesi Farmaceutici of Parma, Italy, which market and make poractant alfa. None of the researchers have financial interests in either company.

Toni Baker | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcg.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Biocompatible 3-D tracking system has potential to improve robot-assisted surgery

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Real-time MRI analysis powered by supercomputers

17.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in pediatric skin infections

17.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>