Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

A research group on medical physics studies dosimetry in radiotherapy through Monte Carlo techniques

05.02.2007
The mathematical tool, quite used in Medical Physics, takes its name from the city of Montecarlo, well-known for its bingo halls and games of chance.

It allows to carry out calculations taking into account all the physical magnitudes that come into play when the particle beam making up the radiation acts on the patient. Leticia Rojas Calderón´s doctoral thesis "Dosimetría Monte Carlo en geometría simples con interfaces: aplicaciones en radioterapia" (Dosimetry Monte Carlo in simple geometries with interfaces: applications in radiotherapy) studies –under the supervision of the Professor of the University of Granada (Universidad de Granada, [http://www.ugr.es]) Antonio M. Lallena Rojo– aspects related to dosimetry of different treatments with radiotherapy through simulations carried out with Monte Carlo.

“We intend to detect the implications of the interfaces and the different materials surrounding the tumor in the dosimetry of the troubles in question”, Lallena points out. In many cases, calculations are carried out without considering the interfaces. However, in the human body there are different materials that influence the final dose placed on the tumors.

They have centred on three kinds of troubles which have in common the presence of interfaces. Thus, the so-called craniopharyngiomas have been studied with a concentric-sphere model to take into account the different materials. Such tumors appearing inside the head are usually treated injecting gel-shaped radionuclides, causing their reduction or disappearance. The habitual practice is carrying out the dosimetry by analytical calculations, considering that all the region of interest is the same material, tender tissue or water.

"Gamma Knife"

The second subject tackled is synovial membrane inflammation in knees, with the appearance of additional tissue causing pain to the patient. Such affection can also be treated with gel-shaped radionuclides. Finally, Monte Carlo tool has been applied in the analysis of the "Gamma Knife" instrument, used in treatment of brain radiosurgery.

In this case, radiation is emitted from outside and the brain interface has been considered to observe how affects the final dose applied to the treated lesion. The patient´s head is modelled like a water sphere with a surface simulating the brain.

With these works of the Department of Modern Physics of the UGR [http://www.ugr.es], “we intend to get to know as exactly as possible the real dose reaching the area that receives the treatment and, on the other hand, to improve dosimetric calculations”. This reserach work is the previous step, basic and necessary, to carry out later research works to establish the appropriate doses for the treatments. In this line, the Department has three more doctoral theses under way as well as keeps a collaboration with the group of Radiobiology of the Faculty of Medicine to observe tumor growth and the optimum treatments against them.

Antonio Marín Ruiz | alfa
Further information:
http://prensa.ugr.es/prensa/research/index.php

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>