Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Immunization rates hit record high in poor countries

29.01.2007
GAVI immunization programs in 2006 prevented 600,000 future deaths, new data shows -- GAVI to devote US $500 million to strengthen health systems in developing countries

New data from the World Health Organization (WHO) show that the GAVI Alliance, a groundbreaking global initiative to increase access to children’s vaccines, has brought immunisation rates to record highs in poor countries.

The WHO data, released today at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting, project that since 2000, GAVI-funded immunisation programs in developing countries have prevented approximately 2.3 million future deaths, and that immunisations in 2006 alone prevented 600,000 future deaths.

Bill and Melinda Gates, co-chairs of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, called the new data a highly encouraging sign of progress in global health. The Gates Foundation has committed a total of US$1.5 billion to support GAVI to date. GAVI has also received funding from 17 donor governments, including Germany, which recently committed €8 million (US$10.4 million).

"GAVI and its partners are leading a major turnaround in children’s health," said Melinda Gates. "When GAVI was founded, immunisation rates in poor countries were on the decline. Today, they are at an all-time high."

Since its inception in 2000, GAVI has committed US$2.6 billion to support national immunisation programs in more than 70 developing countries. According to the WHO projections released today, as a result of GAVI funding:

- 28 million more children have been protected against diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis, helping to increase overall immunisation rates for these diseases from 63 percent in 1999 to 77 percent in 2006.

- 138 million more children have received new and under-used vaccines, such as those for hepatitis B, Hib, and yellow fever, helping to greatly increase immunisation coverage for these diseases. For example, the number of developing countries providing hepatitis B vaccine rose from 15 in 1999 to 61 in 2006.

"GAVI has demonstrated that with the right resources and leadership, it is possible to make dramatic health gains in poor countries," said Bill Gates. "We need to build on this success. No child should be denied access to lifesaving immunisations."

Despite GAVI’s progress, in 2005, an estimated 28 million children in developing countries were not immunised, and 2.5 million children died of vaccine-preventable diseases. To close this gap, WHO and UNICEF estimate that an additional US$10-15 billion will be needed for immunisation programs over the next decade. More funding will be needed to introduce vaccines that are currently in the development pipeline.

GAVI Commits US$500 Million to Strengthen Health Systems

In an effort to further increase global immunisation coverage, GAVI also announced today that it will invest US$500 million over five years to strengthen basic health systems in developing countries.

Weak health care infrastructure is often the main barrier to providing immunisations to children in developing countries, particularly in the poorest and most remote communities.

The new GAVI funding will provide flexible grants to developing countries for activities such as:

- Recruiting and training health care workers

- Building and strengthening systems to distribute vaccines and drugs

- Transporting health care workers and equipment
- Purchasing basic medical supplies, such as antibiotics and clean childbirth kits

"This is an exciting new direction for us," said Julian Lob-Levyt, Executive Secretary of GAVI. "Developing country leaders are telling us that in order for immunisation programs to be sustained, they need greater support for basic health infrastructure."

The first round of GAVI grants for strengthening health systems will be announced in February.

Jean-Pierre Le Calvez | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.gavialliance.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>