Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Teens overlooked in cancer research

08.01.2007
McMaster University pediatric cancer specialist Dr. Ronald Barr says the teen gap in cancer care has been overlooked for far too long.

Statistics show that gains in survival rates for teenagers and young adults (age 15 - 29) with cancer are dismal when compared to those for youngsters and older adults with the disease.

"While there have been improvements in survival in children and older adults in recent decades there has been no such improvement in this age group in the past 25 years or so," said Barr, a professor of pediatrics of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine at McMaster University and chief of hematology-oncology at McMaster Children's Hospital.

Barr, who is involved in local, national and international efforts to reverse this trend, is available for interviews to discuss this issue.

Barr is one of the editors of the recently released and first definitive document on the incidence, survival and mortality of 15 - 29 year-olds. Funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the United States, this monograph was a co-operative venture between the Children's Oncology Group (all 17 pediatric oncology centers in Canada and more than 200 American institutions) and the SEER (Survival Epidemiology and End Results) program.

Barr is a member of the NCI and Lance Armstrong Foundation's new Progress Review Group whose sole purpose is identifying and prioritizing the scientific, medical and psychosocial barriers facing adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. They plan to develop strategies to better the odds for this age group.

"The Lance Armstrong Foundation is very keen to advocate for young people with cancer and educate them in high schools, colleges and work places to the fact cancer can afflict people in their age group - and that when they get a lump they shouldn't say 'it's just a lump' but that it might be a form of cancer," Barr said.

Barr co-chairs the Working Group on AYA within the International Society for Pediatric Oncology which will soon publish proceedings from its first workshop on AYA adolescent and young adults with cancer. He is also one of the authors and editors of an upcoming book on this issue.

He said there are a variety of reasons why the outlook is so poor for this particular age group. Chief among them is the fact so few are participating in clinical trials - organized studies which test the value of various treatments, such as drugs or surgery in human beings. This lack of involvement correlates directly with their poor survival rates, he said.

Young people's feelings of invincibility, coupled with a lack of awareness about their cancer risk, are other factors. And often family physicians aren't suspicious enough of teenagers' symptoms, interpreting a lump in the neck as an infection or leg pain as an athletic injury or growing pains, which delays an accurate diagnosis.

Even more confusing, Barr said, is the fact that the types of cancer within the 15 - 29 age group occur at different frequencies across this age range, the most common types in teenagers being different from the most common types in young adults.

Veronica mcGuire | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcmaster.ca

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change
17.11.2017 | Deutsches Zentrum für integrative Biodiversitätsforschung (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New proton record: Researchers measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision

High-precision measurement of the g-factor eleven times more precise than before / Results indicate a strong similarity between protons and antiprotons

The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this measurement was laid over ten...

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Lightning, with a chance of antimatter

24.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

A huge hydrogen generator at the Earth's core-mantle boundary

24.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

Scientists find why CP El Niño is harder to predict than EP El Niño

24.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>