Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New study finds on/off switch for septic shock

16.11.2006
According to a new study, septic shock--a dangerous, often deadly runaway immune response--is controlled by a genetic on/off switch. The research also suggests how a drug might temper sepsis. This is the first time this genetic mechanism has been revealed in an experimental animal.

The study by Robert Schneider, Ph.D., the Albert B. Sabin Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Pathogenesis at NYU School of Medicine and his colleagues, is being published in the November 15th print edition of the journal Genes & Development

A killer and a protector

Septic shock is the nation's 10th most frequent cause of death and the leading cause of hospital-related mortality. Bacterial infection, notably the toxins that are part of the bacterial cell wall, stimulate the inflammatory response which can spin out of control. Sepsis progresses swiftly from chills, fever and shallow breathing, to dilated and leaky blood vessels, a lack of blood supply in the body's organs, multiple organ failure and, often, death.

Infection causes the body's immune system to produce protective proteins called cytokines. Problems arise when the body is unable to turn off cytokine production and they overwhelm the body, says Dr. Schneider. "The resulting cytokine storm is, for example, what kills people when they are infected with anthrax and, we think, an important factor in what killed people in the flu pandemic of 1918," he says.

Dr. Schneider and his colleagues focused on one of the key genes that regulate cytokine production called auf1, which has been extensively studied in tissue culture but not in animals. In an attempt to move the research closer to the clinical setting, the team genetically engineered and bred mice lacking the auf1 gene, a so-called knock-out mouse. Then, mice with the gene and mice without it were exposed to a bacterial toxin that causes mild food poisoning. The normal mice had little problem fending off the endotoxin. "The mice without the gene died due to an uncontrolled septic-shock like response--their blood vessels burst, their spleens were destroyed," says Dr. Schneider. Mortality was five-fold higher in mice without the auf1 gene.

Further research showed where auf1 functions at the molecular level, he says. In normal mice, the scientists found that auf1 steps into action once the immune response is activated and after cytokine production gets underway. The action is pronounced: messenger RNAs (mRNAs) which are blueprints for very specific cytokines--namely interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha and COX-2--are degraded. That process of degrading the mRNAs shuts off production of these cytokines.

In the study, mice lacking the auf1 gene do not seem to have that off switch; their cytokine levels were greatly elevated. A cytokine storm had caused sepsis in these animals.

In summary, auf1 is a protector that can stop an infection from progressing to septic shock, explains Dr. Schneider. It does so by helping with cytokine production and then tempering the production of these proteins. Auf1 acts like a cytokine on/off switch.

The future possibilities

Dr. Schneider believes auf1 makes an excellent target for the development of therapeutics. For example, a drug could turn on auf1 or stabilize its activity as a way to specifically tone down production of those cytokines that are the major players in sepsis, he says. His study results might also help explain why many previous sepsis drug trials have failed. The cytokine storm needs to be turned off at its source, he says, and auf1 offers the on/off switch to do just that.

Jennifer Choi | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.nyumc.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>