Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

HealthGrades 2007 hospital-quality study and ratings released; chasm widens between best and worst

17.10.2006
The most comprehensive annual study of hospital quality in America examines 41 million hospitalization records at 5,000 hospitals over three years; shows mortality rates decline

The largest annual study of hospital quality in America, issued today by HealthGrades, finds a typical patient, on average, has a 69 percent lower chance of dying at the nation's 5-star rated hospitals compared with the 1-star hospitals. This "quality chasm" between the best and poorest-performing hospitals has grown by approximately 5 percent since last year's study, even as overall mortality rates have improved by nearly 8 percent.

The ninth annual HealthGrades Hospital Quality in America Study analyzes 40.6 million Medicare hospitalization records, from the years 2003 through 2005, to rate the quality of care at each of the nation's more than 5,000 nonfederal hospitals. To help consumers compare the quality of local hospitals, HealthGrades posts its ratings free of charge on its consumer Web site, HealthGrades.com, and in its suite of decision-support tools that major employers and health plans offer as a benefit to employees and plan members.

"This year's study finds that mortality rates among Medicare patients continues to decline, however the differences in patient outcomes between 5-star and 1-star hospitals remains large and is getting larger, a concerning finding," said Samantha Collier, MD, the author of the study and the vice president of medical affairs at HealthGrades, the leading independent healthcare ratings organization. "But these are more than numbers. According to the study, more than 300,000 Medicare lives could have been saved during the three years studied if all hospitals performed at the level of hospitals rated with 5 stars."

For example, the study shows that a typical patient having coronary bypass surgery has a 72.9 percent lower risk of mortality, on average, if they have the procedure at a 5-star rated hospital compared with a 1-star rated hospital. If all Medicare coronary bypass surgery patients from 2003 to 2005 went to 5-star hospitals, 5,308 lives could have been saved.

The annual HealthGrades study rates every nonfederal hospital with a 1-, 3- or 5-star rating indicating poor, average or excellent outcomes in each of 28 medical categories. Taken together, the individual hospital ratings produce the following findings:

- The nation's in-hospital risk-adjusted mortality rate improved, on average, 7.89 percent from 2003 to 2005. But the degree of improvement varied widely by procedure and diagnosis studied.

- Five-star rated hospitals had significantly lower risk-adjusted mortality rates across all three years studied and improved, over the years 2003 to 2005, 19 percent more than the U.S. hospital average and 57 percent more than 1-star rated hospitals.

- A typical patient would have, on average, a 69 percent lower chance of dying in a 5-star rated hospital compared to a 1-star rated hospital, and a 49 percent lower chance of dying in a 5-star rated hospital compared to the U.S. hospital average.

- If all hospitals performed at the level of a 5-star rated hospital across 18 of the procedures and diagnoses studied, 302,403 Medicare lives could have potentially been saved from 2003 through 2005. Fifty percent of the potentially preventable deaths were associated with just four diagnoses: Heart Failure, Community Acquired Pneumonia, Sepsis and Respiratory Failure.

The full study, along with its methodology, can be found at http://www.healthgrades.com/media/DMS/pdf/HealthGradesNinthAnnual

HospitalQualityinAmericaStudy.pdf.

The full press release can be found at http://www.healthgrades.com/media/DMS/pdf/HealthGradesHospital

QualityAmerica2007StudyReleaseFinal.pdf

About HealthGrades

Health Grades, Inc. (Nasdaq: HGRD) is the leading healthcare ratings organization, providing ratings and profiles of hospitals, nursing homes and physicians. Millions of consumers and many of the nation's largest employers, health plans and hospitals rely on HealthGrades' independent ratings and decision-support resources to make healthcare decisions based on the quality of care.

Scott Shapiro | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.healthgrades.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Smart Data Transformation – Surfing the Big Wave
02.12.2016 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Angewandte Informationstechnik FIT

nachricht Climate change could outpace EPA Lake Champlain protections
18.11.2016 | University of Vermont

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

High-precision magnetic field sensing

05.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Construction of practical quantum computers radically simplified

05.12.2016 | Information Technology

NASA's AIM observes early noctilucent ice clouds over Antarctica

05.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>