Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Women feel thin models are more elegant, interesting and pleasant

20.09.2006
Thin fashion models help sell products because many women feel that putting on weight shows a lack of willpower, a new study says.

Researchers from the University of Bath found that two-thirds of women they interviewed reacted favourably to print advertisements featuring thinner female models whereas less than a third liked models of a larger size.

Those who preferred thinner models tended to believe that weight can be controlled by dieting or exercise. They tended to think the thinner models were more “elegant”, “interesting”, “likeable” and “pleasant”.

Because they much preferred the slimmer models, they were more likely to approve of the product the models was advertising, in this case food products such as up-market salad combinations and gourmet hamburgers.

The women who believed they were in control of their weight – who tended to be thinner – also were less likely to have friends who were larger women, and some of them believed that larger women were a little untrustworthy.

Those who believed that weight was not controllable – who were themselves more likely to be larger – were less likely to see the slim model as an ideal, and were less impressed with the product advertised.

The researchers interviewed 470 women undergraduates, of whom 67 per cent reacted favourably to print advertisements featuring thinner female models whereas only 29 per cent reacted favourably to models of a larger size. Those women who were thinner were more likely to believe weight could be controlled.

The study’s results come a week after the Culture Secretary, Tessa Jowell, warned of the dangers of girls starving themselves to emulate waif-like supermodels. Earlier this month the Madrid fashion week imposed restrictions on very thin models.

“This study shows us why using thin models is a successful strategy by advertising companies," said Professor Brett Martin, of the University of Bath’s Marketing Group in its School of Management.

“Women who believe that weight can be controlled by taking exercise and dieting believe that a thin model has succeeded in controlling her own weight and is someone they can relate to. These women tended to be thinner.

“They also believe the model to be more likeable and pleasant too – an idealised version of themselves in fact.

“The fact that the model endorses a certain product means that they feel that product must also be a good one and are more inclined to buy it.

“Women who don’t feel weight is under the control of individuals – and this view was associated with larger women – feel the model has just got lucky genetics and are less inclined to see the model as possessing more attractive psychological qualities, though they don’t favour larger models either.

“So with women who believe weight can be controlled, the thin model will work, and among women who don’t believe it can be controlled, the model size doesn’t matter.

“So the recent idea among some commentators that women will respond to models who are average size is generally not right.”

The study found:

• 72 per cent of thin women feel they have control over their own weight; 32 per cent of larger women feel this.

• 65 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight thought the thinner model was elegant; 48 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this

• 57 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight thought the thinner model was interesting; 32 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this

• 60 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight thought the thinner model was likeable; 47 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this

• 64 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight thought the thinner model was pleasant; 56 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this

• 50 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight said they did not have many friends who were larger women; 43 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this

• 17 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight agreed that “I really don’t like fat people much”; 13 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this

• 67 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight agreed that “fat people tend to be fat pretty much through their own fault”; 45 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this

• 12 per cent of those women who felt they could control their weight agreed that “fat people were a little untrustworthy”; 7 per cent of those who thought weight was genetic-determined felt this.

Tony Trueman | alfa
Further information:
http://www.bath.ac.uk/news/releases

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Physics of bubbles could explain language patterns
25.07.2017 | University of Portsmouth

nachricht Obstructing the ‘inner eye’
07.07.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Abrupt motion sharpens x-ray pulses

Spectrally narrow x-ray pulses may be “sharpened” by purely mechanical means. This sounds surprisingly, but a team of theoretical and experimental physicists developed and realized such a method. It is based on fast motions, precisely synchronized with the pulses, of a target interacting with the x-ray light. Thereby, photons are redistributed within the x-ray pulse to the desired spectral region.

A team of theoretical physicists from the MPI for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg has developed a novel method to intensify the spectrally broad x-ray...

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genome

28.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heavy metals in water meet their match

28.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Oestrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cells

28.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>