Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Prostate cancer treatment increases risk of diabetes and heart disease

19.09.2006
Physicians and patients should be aware of potential risks associated with GnRH agonist therapy

A treatment mainstay for prostate cancer puts men at increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a large observational study published in the Sept. 20 Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"Men with prostate cancer have high five-year survival rates, but they also have higher rates of non-cancer mortality than healthy men," says study author Nancy Keating, MD, MPH, assistant professor of health care policy and of medicine at Harvard Medical School. "This study shows that a common hormonal treatment for prostate cancer may put men at significant risk for other serious diseases. Patients and physicians need to be aware of the elevated risk as they make treatment decisions."

The principal systemic therapy for prostate cancer involves blocking testosterone production. This is done either by removal of the testes (bilateral orchiectomy), or more commonly, by regular injections of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist drug. GnRH agonists are the main therapy for metastatic prostate cancer and may also improve survival for some men with locally-advanced cancers.

However, little is known about the efficacy of GnRH agonists in treating men with less-advanced local or regional prostate cancer, many of whom receive this therapy. Earlier studies have found GnRH agonists to be associated with obesity and insulin resistance, a precursor to diabetes.

"Our study found that men with local or regional prostate cancer receiving a GnRH agonist had a 44 percent higher risk of developing diabetes and a 16 percent higher risk of developing coronary heart disease than men who were not receiving hormone therapy," says Keating, who is also a physician at Brigham and Women's Hospital.

"Doctors should think twice about prescribing GnRH agonists in situations for which studies have not demonstrated improved survival until we better understand the risks of treatment," says co-author Matthew Smith, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine at HMS and a medical oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital. "For men who do require this treatment, physicians may want to talk with their patients about strategies, such as exercise and weight loss, which may help to lower risk of diabetes and heart disease."

Given the number of men receiving GnRH agonists, often for many months or years, these increased risks can have important implications for the health of prostate cancer survivors, says Keating. Additional studies are needed to fully understand the biological mechanisms responsible for these increased risks.

Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer among men, affecting more than 200,000 men in the United States every year. With prostate cancer's favorable prognosis, however, decisions about treatments are particularly important because adverse effects and complications of treatments may impact overall health and quality of life more than prostate cancer itself.

The study assessed whether androgen deprivation therapy was associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, coronary heart disease, myocardial infarction, or sudden cardiac death by examining data from approximately 73,000 men age 66 or older who were diagnosed with local or regional prostate cancer.

Leah Gourley | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://hms.harvard.edu/

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Obstructing the ‘inner eye’
07.07.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

nachricht Drone vs. truck deliveries: Which create less carbon pollution?
31.05.2017 | University of Washington

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>