Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Study evaluates effectiveness of sonographically guided therapy in professional soccer players

Soccer players with posterior ankle impingement can return to athletic activity rapidly with the use of a sonographically guided injection of steroid and anesthetic, according to a recent study conducted at Leeds Teaching Hospitals in Leeds, UK.

The study consisted of ten professional soccer players, between the ages of 22-30, with no previous posterior ankle pain who underwent MRI and sonographically guided injection for clinical posterior impingement. According to the study, despite rehabilitation with resolution of anterior and lateral symptoms after an initial inversion injury, all players developed posterior pain that was resistant to conservative therapy 3-4 weeks after the precipitating injury. The pain limited the athletes' ability to sprint and strike the soccer ball and prevented them from returning to competition.

"In our practice, we see many professional athletes with this condition and we found that the majority of them were showing excellent response to this treatment," said Philip Robinson, MD, and lead author of the study. "We decided to analyze the imaging features and injection results more rigorously for publication."

All players underwent MRI of the ankle after clinical examination by a foot and ankle surgeon. Sonographically guided injection was then performed into the posterior capsule abnormality. Posterolateal capsule thickening and synovitis involving an intact posterior talofibular ligament (ligament located in the back of the foot) were present in all ten patients.

According to the study, all players tolerated the injection procedure with no immediate or delayed complications. All patients noted a marked decrease in symptoms and stiffness immediately after the injection of bupivacaine (anesthetic).

"For patients, the results of this study mean that they should have a faster recovery time and may not require arthroscopy. It also demonstrates that ankle impingement syndromes which appear predominately soft tissue based can respond to image guided injection treatment," said Dr. Robinson.

Necoya Lightsey | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Diagnoses: When Are Several Opinions Better Than One?
19.07.2016 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

nachricht High in calories and low in nutrients when adolescents share pictures of food online
07.04.2016 | University of Gothenburg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>