Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Minimally invasive procedure restores blood flow to kidneys, research suggests

05.07.2006
A pilot study suggests that the results of minimally invasive angioplasty and stenting to restore blood flow to the kidneys can be significantly improved if a suction device is used to remove the material blocking the vessel. The results, from a study at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, are reported in the July issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery.

"Three to six weeks after the minimally invasive procedure, kidney function was roughly equal to what is typically achieved with major surgery," said Matthew S. Edwards, M.D., M.S., assistant professor of surgery and lead author. "We hope this will lead to a better way to do angioplasty and stenting by preventing damage to the kidneys and improving kidney function."

The study suggests that the key to success was using suction to prevent the plaque and other material that make up blockages from reaching the kidneys and causing damage. In previous studies of angioplasty without a suction or filtering device, results have been inconsistent.

Angioplasty involves inserting a balloon-like device into the vessel to crush fatty deposits that are blocking blood flow. In many cases, a stent, or scaffold-like device, is inserted to help keep the vessel open. In this study, Edwards used what is called a "distal embolic protection system" that consisted of a balloon system to temporarily block the vessel and a suction system to remove the bits of crushed material that made up the blockage. (Undesirable particles and air bubbles in the blood are known generally as "emboli.")

The study involved 32 patients with a mean age of 70 years. Kidney function improved in 50 percent of the procedures and worsened in none. The narrowed arteries were reopened in 100 percent of cases and mean blood pressure was reduced from 176/81 mm Hg to 158/76 mm Hg.

"These data suggest that distal embolic protection systems may prevent damage to the kidneys during angioplasty and stenting and warrant further investigation," said Edwards.

Surgery to restore blood flow to the kidneys is a common procedure, said Edwards. Previous research at Wake Forest found that about 7 percent of healthy older Americans have renal artery stenosis, or narrowing in the main artery leading to the kidneys, and about 40,000 of the 3.5 million Americans who have the condition will require surgery.

The condition is most common in people with severe, difficult to control high blood pressure. Over time, the hypertension can lead to the narrowed vessels. Conversely, in a small number of cases, it is narrowed vessels to the kidneys that cause hypertension. Surgery may be called for when patients have abnormal kidney function because of reduced blood flow to the organs, or when the uncontrolled hypertension has led to heart failure or blockages in other vessels in the body, such as those leading to the heart.

Without successful surgery to open the kidney vessels and improve organ function, patients have a much greater risk of adverse cardiovascular events, dialysis dependence and death, Edwards said. He plans further studies, in larger groups of patients, of the less invasive procedure for restoring blood flow.

Karen Richardson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wfubmc.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>