Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Three million babies born using assisted reproductive technologies

21.06.2006
More than three million babies have been born worldwide using assisted reproductive technologies (ART) since the first ART baby (Louise Brown) was born in the UK 28 years ago.

According to the 2002 World report on ART presented at the 22nd annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Prague, Czech Republic, on Wednesday, 21 June 2006, 200,000 ART babies were born around the world in 2002. This compares with about 30,000 born in 1989, which was the first year that data were collected for the World report.

The report includes data from 52 countries, covering almost 600,000 ART cycles and 122,000 newborn babies. Dr Jacques de Mouzon, a member of the International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART), told the conference: “The ICMART report covers two-thirds of the world’s ART activity, so the total number of ART cycles in the world can be estimated at one million a year, and the number of ART babies produced at around 200,000 a year.”

Since the previous World report for the year 2000, another four countries have started to contribute data to ICMART and there has been an increase of 100,000 cycles and 20,000 newborn babies. Data from most of Africa and many Asian countries is still missing.

One in six couples worldwide experience some form of infertility problem, but there are huge variations in availability and efficacy of ART between countries.

Dr de Mouzon said: “The average pregnancy rate for each cycle using fresh embryos was 25.1% and the delivery rate was 18.5%. However, these rates varied from 13.6% to 40.5% for pregnancy, and 9.1% to 37.1% for delivery. Availability was highest in Israel where there were 3,260 cycles per million inhabitants, followed by Denmark with 2,031 cycles per million, and it was lowest in most of the Latin American countries where there were less than 100 cycles per million.”

Europe leads the world for ART treatment, initiating nearly 56% of all reported ART cycles. Almost 50% of the reported cycles in the world were in just four countries: USA (112,000), Germany (85,000), France (64,000) and the UK (37,000).

Another important phenomenon revealed by the world data is the trend away from multiple embryo transfers (and multiple pregnancies) towards single embryo transfer (SET).

“If we compare 2002 with 1998, there is a decline in several countries in the number of transferred embryos. However, this has not resulted in a sharp drop in the pregnancy rate except in the USA, indicating that efficacy is improving. The average number of embryos transferred in Europe now is 2.2%, while in the States it has dropped from 3.5% to 2.9%.”

The percentage of ART births out of all births was highest in Denmark at 3.9% and lowest in Latin America at less than 0.1%.

“There is a real inequality between the different countries, and this is due to money,” said Dr de Mouzon. “Some countries provide free cycles of IVF, while in others, couples cannot have ART unless they can pay for it, for example through medical insurance.”

Professor Anders Nyboe Andersen presented figures from 2003 in Europe to the conference. The report from the ESHRE European IVF Monitoring committee included data from 28 European countries. There were 357,884 cycles in 2003, which represents a 10% increase on the previous year.

He said: “The trend towards single embryo transfer is the most important message. The Nordic countries and Belgium lead the way in this. In Sweden today there is 70% elective SET, which has resulted in a decline in twin birth rates to 5%, which is sensational. Triplets have virtually disappeared in Europe, but there are still countries where the triplet rate is too high.

“Elective SET is only of major importance in Finland, Sweden and Belgium. They have achieved this in different ways. In Finland, it has happened because patients and clinicians have chosen to do it. In Sweden, it has been achieved through regulation, and in Belgium it has been achieved through financial incentives, whereby patients have their IVF treatment paid for them by the state if they choose SET.”

Professor Karl Nygren, chairman of the ESHRE EIM and ICMART committees, said: “These two reports together document the fact that the technique of IVF is spreading rapidly around the world, not only in Europe, but everywhere, although there are still inequalities in availability and efficacy between countries. ART is being used increasingly in India and China and we look forward to them contributing data in the future.”

Mary Rice | alfa
Further information:
http://www.mrcommunication.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>