Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Three million babies born using assisted reproductive technologies

21.06.2006
More than three million babies have been born worldwide using assisted reproductive technologies (ART) since the first ART baby (Louise Brown) was born in the UK 28 years ago.

According to the 2002 World report on ART presented at the 22nd annual conference of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology in Prague, Czech Republic, on Wednesday, 21 June 2006, 200,000 ART babies were born around the world in 2002. This compares with about 30,000 born in 1989, which was the first year that data were collected for the World report.

The report includes data from 52 countries, covering almost 600,000 ART cycles and 122,000 newborn babies. Dr Jacques de Mouzon, a member of the International Committee for Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ICMART), told the conference: “The ICMART report covers two-thirds of the world’s ART activity, so the total number of ART cycles in the world can be estimated at one million a year, and the number of ART babies produced at around 200,000 a year.”

Since the previous World report for the year 2000, another four countries have started to contribute data to ICMART and there has been an increase of 100,000 cycles and 20,000 newborn babies. Data from most of Africa and many Asian countries is still missing.

One in six couples worldwide experience some form of infertility problem, but there are huge variations in availability and efficacy of ART between countries.

Dr de Mouzon said: “The average pregnancy rate for each cycle using fresh embryos was 25.1% and the delivery rate was 18.5%. However, these rates varied from 13.6% to 40.5% for pregnancy, and 9.1% to 37.1% for delivery. Availability was highest in Israel where there were 3,260 cycles per million inhabitants, followed by Denmark with 2,031 cycles per million, and it was lowest in most of the Latin American countries where there were less than 100 cycles per million.”

Europe leads the world for ART treatment, initiating nearly 56% of all reported ART cycles. Almost 50% of the reported cycles in the world were in just four countries: USA (112,000), Germany (85,000), France (64,000) and the UK (37,000).

Another important phenomenon revealed by the world data is the trend away from multiple embryo transfers (and multiple pregnancies) towards single embryo transfer (SET).

“If we compare 2002 with 1998, there is a decline in several countries in the number of transferred embryos. However, this has not resulted in a sharp drop in the pregnancy rate except in the USA, indicating that efficacy is improving. The average number of embryos transferred in Europe now is 2.2%, while in the States it has dropped from 3.5% to 2.9%.”

The percentage of ART births out of all births was highest in Denmark at 3.9% and lowest in Latin America at less than 0.1%.

“There is a real inequality between the different countries, and this is due to money,” said Dr de Mouzon. “Some countries provide free cycles of IVF, while in others, couples cannot have ART unless they can pay for it, for example through medical insurance.”

Professor Anders Nyboe Andersen presented figures from 2003 in Europe to the conference. The report from the ESHRE European IVF Monitoring committee included data from 28 European countries. There were 357,884 cycles in 2003, which represents a 10% increase on the previous year.

He said: “The trend towards single embryo transfer is the most important message. The Nordic countries and Belgium lead the way in this. In Sweden today there is 70% elective SET, which has resulted in a decline in twin birth rates to 5%, which is sensational. Triplets have virtually disappeared in Europe, but there are still countries where the triplet rate is too high.

“Elective SET is only of major importance in Finland, Sweden and Belgium. They have achieved this in different ways. In Finland, it has happened because patients and clinicians have chosen to do it. In Sweden, it has been achieved through regulation, and in Belgium it has been achieved through financial incentives, whereby patients have their IVF treatment paid for them by the state if they choose SET.”

Professor Karl Nygren, chairman of the ESHRE EIM and ICMART committees, said: “These two reports together document the fact that the technique of IVF is spreading rapidly around the world, not only in Europe, but everywhere, although there are still inequalities in availability and efficacy between countries. ART is being used increasingly in India and China and we look forward to them contributing data in the future.”

Mary Rice | alfa
Further information:
http://www.mrcommunication.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht First form of therapy for childhood dementia CLN2 developed
25.04.2018 | Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf

nachricht Do microplastics harbour additional risks by colonization with harmful bacteria?
05.04.2018 | Leibniz-Institut für Ostseeforschung Warnemünde

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Getting electrons to move in a semiconductor

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Reconstructing what makes us tick

25.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Cheap 3-D printer can produce self-folding materials

25.04.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>