Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Intimate partner violence found widespread

18.05.2006


It harms women’s health, say Group Health researchers



Intimate partner violence (IPV), a.k.a. domestic violence, is common and damages women’s physical and mental health significantly, according to a Group Health study reported in two papers in the June issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.
In a random sample of more than 3,400 women members of Group Health Cooperative, nearly half--44 percent--reported having experienced IPV during their adult lifetime.

"This is an epidemic," said Robert S. Thompson, MD, senior investigator, Group Health Center for Health Studies, lead author of one paper. "But it flies under the radar, because of the stigma and shame associated with it--as well as the fear that many health care providers have of opening what some call a ’Pandora’s Box’ of difficult problems that they are unsure how to address."



This study is the first to find that the more recent a woman’s IPV, and the longer it has gone on, the worse her physical and mental health and social network are likely to be.

"IPV harms women’s physical and mental health even more than do other common conditions, such as back pain and even several forms of cancer," said Amy E. Bonomi, PhD, MPH, research associate, Group Health Center for Health Studies, lead author of the other paper. Compared to women with no IPV, women with recent physical IPV were four times as likely to report symptoms of severe depression, nearly three times as likely to report poor or fair health and more than one additional symptom. They also reported lower social functioning by several measures.

Previous estimates ranged from a quarter to a half of women experiencing IPV during their adult lifetimes, depending on how researchers defined IPV and whom they sampled, with young, low-income women reporting more IPV. Interestingly, this study (reporting a prevalence of nearly one half) involves health plan enrollees who tend to be older and have higher incomes and more education than average, making it clear that IPV is an equal-opportunity problem.

Bonomi and Thompson found the effects of physical abuse (slapping, hitting, kicking, or forced sex) to be stronger than those of nonphysical abuse (threats, chronic disparaging remarks, or controlling behavior) alone. But they also found that both physical and nonphysical IPV significantly damage women’s health, and that physical abuse often accompanies nonphysical abuse.

IPV persisted for more than 20 years in 5 percent to 13 percent of the women, with more than one partner perpetrating IPV on 11 percent to 21 percent of them, with these ranges depending on the type of abuse. Prevalence was 15 percent in the last five years, and 8 percent in the last year, for any IPV.

"We are at a point with IPV that seems similar to where we were with cigarette smoking and alcoholism 20 years ago," said Bonomi. "To prevent IPV from starting and continuing, we need interventions that span individual, community, and social levels." She and Thompson suggest that these interventions should include inquiring routinely about IPV and linking those with positive responses to appropriate services.

Rebecca Hughes | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ghc.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Physics of bubbles could explain language patterns
25.07.2017 | University of Portsmouth

nachricht Obstructing the ‘inner eye’
07.07.2017 | Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA mission surfs through waves in space to understand space weather

25.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Strength of tectonic plates may explain shape of the Tibetan Plateau, study finds

25.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

The dense vessel network regulates formation of thrombocytes in the bone marrow

25.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>