Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Locked door psychiatric units have more disadvantages than advantages say staff

25.04.2006


The disadvantages of locking the front doors of psychiatric units outnumber the advantages by more than two to one according to a study published in the latest Journal of Clinical Nursing.



Researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden interviewed 40 mental health nurses and nursing assistants working on seven Swedish psychiatric inpatient wards with locked entrance doors.

The majority of patients in their care (45 per cent) had been diagnosed with mood disorders, 33 per cent had anxiety, personality or other disorders and 22 per cent had schizophrenia and psychotic disorders.


Eight advantages and 18 disadvantages were cited by the staff and most of these concerned patients’ experiences.

“Enabling staff to control patients was felt to be an advantage by 85 per cent of staff, providing patients with secure and efficient care by 73 per cent and protection against the outside world by 68 per cent” says lead author Kristina Haglund.

“We know where the patients are” commented one member of staff, while another said that “it gives patients a sense of security when the ward is locked.” Another said that family members were relieved to “know that the patient is safe and secure.”

But there were twice as many disadvantages to contend with.

“The most common disadvantage, mentioned by 83 per cent of respondents, was that controlling the door was an uncomfortable and time-consuming task for staff, which could interrupt ongoing duties or contact with patients” adds Kristina Haglund.

“75 per cent felt that having a locked door could reduce patients’ self-confidence and feeling of personal responsibility.

“48 per cent also expressed worries that it created a non-caring environment and could make patients feel that they had to depend on staff to open the door.”

One member of staff expressed concern that rattling keys could “intensity the ‘prison’ atmosphere” and others worried that it added “to the feeling of illness”, caused “agitation” or made patients “passive”. Staff also talked about difficult issues relating to voluntary patients who didn’t need to be locked in.

Locked doors also made staff question their role. “At the same time that you are caring for a patient you must be a sort of guard too” said one respondent. Other staff said it made them feel “shut-in”.

There was also practical concern that locked doors could be a hindrance in an emergency.

Just over half of the staff surveyed (53 per cent) had also worked on an open door psychiatric unit. The majority (70 per cent) were female and the average age of the 20 registered nurses was 52 – five years older than the 20 mental health nurse assistants.

The registered nurses had been working in their current role for an average of 10 years, compared with eight years for the nurse assistants.

39 of the 40 participants mentioned both advantages and disadvantages during their taped interviews, which averaged 20 minutes and were carried out by an interviewer with extensive experience of working in mental health care.

One participant – a mental health nursing assistant – mentioned only disadvantages.

Both groups cited an almost equal number of advantages, but registered nurses mentioned more than 27 per cent more disadvantages.

Another survey carried out in the same year as this research found that three-quarters of Swedish psychiatric units were locked.

“It’s clear from our research that staff have mixed feelings about locked door psychiatric units” concludes Kristina Haglund.

“On the one hand locked doors can undermine the purpose of the care being provided. But on the other hand, they can help staff to provide patients with a structured and safe environment that reduces the risk of them leaving the ward and harming themselves or others.”

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/jcn

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating stars

22.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>