Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

How, not where, you die matters most to terminal patients

06.03.2006


The circumstances around their dying - and not the location - are what matter most to terminally ill Canadians, says Queen’s University Professor of Medicine Daren Heyland.

A national study on end-of-life care led by Dr. Heyland, research director in the Department of Medicine at Kingston General Hospital, shows that patients rated dying at home as less important than having confidence and trust in the doctors looking after them. The results may cast doubt on current efforts to support more patients dying at home, says Dr. Heyland. At present, seven out of every 10 Canadians die in hospital.

Results of the study are published in the current edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).



Also on the research team from Queen’s are Sam Shortt (Centre for Health Services and Policy Research), Joan Tranmer (School of Nursing) and Miu Lam (Community Health and Epidemiology).

Conducted between 2001 and 2003 in hospitals in Kingston, Vancouver, Halifax, Toronto and Edmonton, the survey involved 434 seriously ill elderly patients and 160 family members. Out of 28 factors describing quality care, patients and family members rated "to have trust and confidence in the doctors looking after you" and "not to be kept alive on life supports when there is little hope for a meaningful recovery" as most important.

"To be able to die in the location of your choice, e.g. home or hospital" rated 24th of 28 from the patient’s perspective and 14th of 26 from the family member’s perspective.

Dr. Heyland heads a national research group on palliative and end-of-life care initiatives located at Queen’s and McMaster, with affiliates at other Canadian universities and hospitals. Funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the five-year project began in 2004 and focuses on care in hospitals, intensive care units and home settings.

This is one of five studies to be undertaken by the team. They will also examine how satisfied patients are with their care; how they make decisions about the kinds of treatments they receive at the end of life; the importance of where they die; and how aware patients are of the course of their disease and the odds of recovery.

"Our research focus is to describe, understand, evaluate, and ultimately, improve communication and decision-making at the end of life," says Dr. Heyland. "We believe the knowledge and tools generated by our research efforts will inform strategies to improve the quality of and satisfaction with end of life care."

Composed of 13 institutes, CIHR provides leadership and support to more than 8,000 researchers and research teams in every province of Canada.

To learn more about Research at Queen’s ...

Contacts:

Nancy Dorrance, Queen’s News & Media Services, 613.533.2869

Lorinda Peterson, Queen’s News & Media Services, 613.533.3234

Nancy Dorrance | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.queensu.ca

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Real-time feedback helps save energy and water
08.02.2017 | Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg

nachricht The Great Unknown: Risk-Taking Behavior in Adolescents
19.01.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Bildungsforschung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder

22.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>