Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gum-chewing may speed recovery after colon surgery

21.02.2006


A small study suggests that chewing gum after colon surgery may speed the return of normal bowel function and shorten patients’ hospital stays, according to a report in the February issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Any type of abdominal surgery can cause ileus, a marked decrease or stoppage of intestinal function, according to background information in the article. Pain, vomiting and abdominal distension are the immediate consequences. Ileus also can lead to longer hospital stays, an increased risk of infection and problems breathing, the authors report.

Rob Schuster, M.D., and colleagues at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, California, studied 34 patients who underwent sigmoid colon resection, in which surgeons remove a portion of the large intestine, for cancer or recurrent diverticular diseases. Seventeen of the patients chewed sugarless gum three times a day beginning the morning after their surgeries and lasting until their first bowel movement. The other 17 patients, who did not differ in age, gender, reason for surgery or number of previous surgeries, served as controls.



The gum-chewing group left the hospital after an average of 4.3 days, compared with 6.8 days for the control group. Patients who chewed gum also passed gas sooner (65.4 hours vs. 80.2 hours post-surgery) and had their first bowel movement earlier (after 63.2 hours compared with 89.4 hours) than those who did not. There were no major complications in either group and the gum-chewers had no problems tolerating the gum. All of them continued to chew gum until their bowels began to function again.

Chewing gum may stimulate the same nerves in the body as eating, promoting the release of hormones that activate the gastrointestinal tract, the researchers write. "Early postoperative feeding may stimulate bowel motility, however, many patients fed early after colectomies do not tolerate this," they write. "In a study where patients were given water four hours postoperatively, 20 percent of these patients did not tolerate the intervention."

Gum-chewing may serve as a feasible alternative, an "inexpensive and helpful adjunct to postoperative care after colectomy," they conclude.

Janet O’Neill | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jamamedia.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>