Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Trauma-Center Care Significantly Lowers Risk of Death

26.01.2006


Care at a trauma center lowers by 25 percent the risk of death for injured patients compared to treatment received at non-trauma centers, according to the results of a nationwide study conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Washington School of Medicine. “A National Evaluation of the Effect of Trauma Center Care on Mortality,” to be published in the January 26, 2006, edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, is among the first studies to provide strong evidence of the effectiveness of specialized trauma-care facilities.



“Hospitals have difficulty justifying the expense of maintaining trauma centers without strong evidence of their effectiveness. Now we have conclusive data to show that trauma care is effective,” said the study’s lead author, Ellen J. MacKenzie, PhD, professor and chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. “The findings of this study argue strongly for continued efforts at regionalizing trauma care at the state and local levels to assure that patients who suffer serious injuries get to a trauma center where they are afforded the best possible care.”

The National Study on the Costs and Outcomes of Trauma analyzed the outcomes of 5,190 adult trauma patients who received treatment at 18 level 1 trauma centers (the highest level of care) and 51 non-trauma centers. The researchers also analyzed the characteristics of each hospital, such as the number of patients treated and types of specialty services available.


After adjusting for factors such as severity of injury, patient age and pre-existing medical conditions, the researchers found a 25 percent overall decrease in the risk of death following care in a trauma center compared to receiving care at a non-trauma center. The adjusted in-hospital death rate was 7.6 percent for patients treated at trauma centers compared to 9.5 percent for patients treated at non-trauma facilities. The mortality rate one year following the injury was 10.4 percent for patients at trauma centers compared to 13.8 percent for patients at non-trauma centers.

The researchers noted that the effect of treatment at trauma centers was less significant among older patients with underlying health problems.

“This study provides convincing evidence that care at a level 1 trauma center saves lives,” said Gregory Jurkovich, MD, a University of Washington professor of surgery and a co-author of the study. “Our next step is to see if level 1 trauma center care also improves the quality of life of trauma survivors. We’ll examine the differences in functional outcome and cost of care between level 1 trauma centers and non-trauma centers.”

Caring for the acutely injured is a major public health issue and involves bystanders and community members, health care professionals and health care systems. “This research provides state and community leaders with crucial information, so that they can make sound decisions regarding their trauma systems and the care that people receive after they are injured. It is one way that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contributes to reducing premature death and disability through research and partnerships,” said Richard C. Hunt, MD, director of the CDC’s Injury Center’s Division of Injury Response.

Funding for the study was provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control and the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Aging.

Additional study authors are Frederick P. Rivara, MD, MPH, and Avery B. Nathens, MD, PhD, from the University of Washington School of Medicine; and Katherine P. Frey, MPH, Brian L. Egleston, MPP, David S. Salkever, PhD, and Daniel O. Scharfstein, ScD, from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Public Affairs media contacts for the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health: Kenna Lowe or Tim Parsons at 410-955-6878 or paffairs@jhsph.edu. Photographs of Ellen MacKenzie are available upon request.

Kenna Lowe | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.jhsph.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Win-win strategies for climate and food security
02.10.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Symposium on Driving Simulation

23.10.2017 | Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Taming 'wild' electrons in graphene

23.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Mountain glaciers shrinking across the West

23.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

Scientists track ovarian cancers to site of origin: Fallopian tubes

23.10.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>