Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Race and gender affect lung cancer clinical trial participation


A new study finds significant disparities by race and gender in the enrollment of patients into lung cancer clinical trials. Published in the January 15, 2006 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study indicates that women and African-Americans were least likely to enroll in treatment trials for lung cancer, and identifies a need to improve educational and outreach efforts to make clinical trials available to a wider range of patients.

While clinical trials are important because they test the efficacy of the next generation of potentially life-saving treatments, only five percent of cancer patients participate in clinical trials. Reports have demonstrated that systemic factors in the healthcare system, such as cost, patient education, and physician biases may explain the low accrual rates. But gender and racial inequalities also are apparent, forcing lawmakers in 1993 to direct the healthcare system to encourage women and minority participation. Not only does lack of participation by minorities and women shut them out of the next generation of potentially life-saving treatment, but it also makes it all the more difficult for clinicians to translate treatment benefits and risks found in a clinical trial to these under-represented patient populations.

To evaluate the enrollment rate and the factors predicting enrollment, Wei Du, Ph.D., and colleagues from Wayne State University reviewed data from 427 lung cancer patients (175 African-Americans and 252 from other races) who were eligible for clinical trials between 1994 and 1998 at one center, the Karmanos Cancer Institute in Detroit.

Of this group, 21 percent (91 patients) participated in a lung cancer treatment clinical trial. The researchers found that patients who did not participate were more likely to be African American (45 percent versus 25 percent of enrollees), female (43 percent versus 32 percent of enrollees), and over the age of 70 (24 percent versus 10 percent of enrollees). The researchers say their results should be viewed with caution given that the study looked at enrollment at a single medical center, and did not study other factors that may play a role in clinical trial participation. Those include a lack of trust in the medical establishment, lack of knowledge about clinical trials, and the effect of religious belief or spirituality on the willingness to participate.

Still, they conclude: "New recruitment strategies targeting specific patient subgroups might be helpful in ensuring equal representation of women and minority groups in cancer clinical trials."

David Greenberg | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

Im Focus: ILA 2018: Laser alternative to hexavalent chromium coating

At the 2018 ILA Berlin Air Show from April 25–29, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT is showcasing extreme high-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA): A video documents how for metal components that are highly loaded, EHLA has already proved itself as an alternative to hard chrome plating, which is now allowed only under special conditions.

When the EU restricted the use of hexavalent chromium compounds to special applications requiring authorization, the move prompted a rethink in the surface...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

A new kind of quantum bits in two dimensions

19.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires

19.03.2018 | Materials Sciences

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>