Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study demonstrates role of exercise in modifying melatonin levels

02.12.2005


Increase believed to offer breast cancer protection



Moderate physical activity, which is believed to help reduce the risk of breast cancer, may do so because it increases production of a hormone believed to have protective effects against the disease, a Canadian research team has learned.

Researchers at Mount Sinai Hospital’s Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute in Toronto have completed a study of how light and other factors, such as physical activity, influence the production of melatonin – a hormone released mainly at night in the absence of light and believed to protect against breast cancer. The findings of the study have been published in the December 1, 2005 edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology.


The study is among the first to demonstrate the role of physical activity in potentially modifying melatonin levels, thus creating biological evidence for a reduced risk of breast cancer among women who exercise regularly.

"If we know that increased melatonin production could be an underlying reason for the protective effects of physical activity against breast cancer, then there is great opportunity for the scientific community to build on this knowledge and help women understand what steps they can take to reduce their risk of developing the disease," said Dr. Julia Knight, the study’s lead investigator at the Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital and a University of Toronto professor in the Department of Public Health Sciences.

The study, funded through the Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance with special funding from the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation - Ontario Chapter to study the modifiable risk factors for breast cancer, took place between 2002 and 2004 and involved the participation of 213 female volunteers whose melatonin levels were monitored over time.

"Our focus on primary prevention research was initiated with the long-term goal of building knowledge about how to stop breast cancer before it starts," said Sharon Wood, Executive Director of the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation - Ontario Chapter. "We are encouraged by the findings of Dr. Knight’s work, which could provide momentum for lifestyle changes that could lead to a healthier population and potentially reduce the incidence of breast cancer."

Joanne Woodward Fraser | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.utoronto.ca/

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cells

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences

MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignancies

20.02.2018 | Medical Engineering

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms

20.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>