Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New study shows patients more willing to consider self-injectable HIV therapy than many physicians anticipate

21.11.2005


Latest advances in health psychology may help physicians implement improved HIV care



Initial results from the OpenMind study, the largest behavioural study to look at both patients’ and physicians’ perceptions of HIV care in treatment-experienced patients, were revealed today at EACS. The study’s findings are anticipated to help physicians implement improved care to HIV patients and help pave the way for better acceptance and integration of other new innovative drugs such as monoclonal antibodies that are increasingly being developed for the management of HIV and other diseases.

The study was conceived to look at attitudes to FUZEON (enfuvirtide), the first approved HIV fusion inhibitor, and an important option for treatment-experienced patients who face HIV resistance. FUZEON presents unique challenges because it is the first self-injectable antiretroviral whereas all other treatments are oral.


Highlights from today’s data show that:

  • Patients are more willing to consider and use self-injectable therapy than many physicians anticipate
  • Three-quarters (76%) of patients would consider using a self-injectable HIV therapy if their physician recommended it
  • Worryingly, only one quarter (28%) of patients who are potentially eligible for FUZEON had actually discussed this injectable option with their physicians
  • Only 10% of eligible patients were currently prescribed FUZEON, despite the fact that it is recommended in key international HIV treatment guidelines

This study also identifies some of the main reasons why many physicians may be reluctant to prescribe a treatment of proven efficacy and safety. The reasons include; the physicians’ perception that patients would be reluctant to use a self-injectable therapy, the physicians’ opinion that the patient would not be able to incorporate FUZEON into their lifestyle and the potential misconception that FUZEON is not appropriately recommended in guidelines.

“Physicians’ best intentions in trying to match treatments to patients may actually be limiting the use of FUZEON in those patients who are most likely to benefit,” said Rob Horne, Professor of Psychology at the University of Brighton and OpenMind study author. “These new insights from the OpenMind study will enable us to develop tools to facilitate more informed decisions by both patient and physician.”

The study also shows that physicians’ own experiences and attitudes towards self-injection are a significant motivator for its use. Physicians with considerable FUZEON experience were significantly more likely to justify using self-injectable therapy in terms of time and resources and were less likely to doubt its efficacy relative to oral therapies, when compared to physicians less experienced with this type of treatment.

Dr Mike Youle, Director of HIV Clinical Research, Royal Free Hospital, London and co-author of the OpenMind study stated, “With the increasing choice of injectable biotech drugs including monoclonal antibodies, these findings potentially have far reaching implications across a whole range of therapeutic areas. We look forward to presenting the final results and exploring possible interventions at major congresses next year.”

Peter Impey | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ketchum.com

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Multi-year study finds 'hotspots' of ammonia over world's major agricultural areas
17.03.2017 | University of Maryland

nachricht Diabetes Drug May Improve Bone Fat-induced Defects of Fracture Healing
17.03.2017 | Deutsches Institut für Ernährungsforschung Potsdam-Rehbrücke

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>