Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New studies shed light on stroke prevention and management

19.09.2005


Coinciding with National Stroke Week in Australia (19 - 25 September 2005) is the release of results from two recent stroke studies from the George Institute for International Health that investigate both the causative factors as well as a little studied outcome of stroke, that of depression. The studies are part of a larger project to determine the impact of prevention strategies and improvements in stroke healthcare.

A study of trends in stroke incidence, led by The George Institute researchers Craig Anderson and Kristie Carter and to be published in Stroke*, reviewed data accumulated over 20 years in the Auckland, New Zealand population, to determine if significant changes in stroke incidence could be related to life-style changes or other factors. The study found that there was an 11% relative decline in stroke over the 20 years, which can be related to positive changes such as a decreased incidence of smoking in the population. However, opposing this positive trend were adverse changes in the health of the Auckland population over the same period, including increased incidence of obesity, diabetes and overall age, all of which increase the likelihood of stroke.

"Clearly more research is needed to identify those at risk of stroke and to implement effective strategies to reduce the burden of this illness", noted Prof. Anderson



Similar analyses are now being conducted on data provided by an investigation of stroke incidence in Perth, Western Australia. These analyses will determine the impact of prevention strategies and improvements in stroke healthcare services on the incidence and outcome of this major illness within the region over recent decades.

Both the Auckland and Perth studies meet the stringent criteria for an ’ideal’ stroke incidence study providing the most reliable data on the incidence and outcome from stroke in a population. Data from these studies will be pooled with similar work from the University of Queensland and the University of Oxford, to better understand risk factors for various stroke subtypes and to organize management strategies.

A further stroke study led by The George Institute’s Maree Hackett, and also to be published in Stroke*, examined predictors of depression after stroke. Depression in stroke victims has been an often neglected area of recovery from stroke, and with past studies focusing primarily on the physical outcomes of stroke, health systems have not been properly configured to deal with the depression aspects.

The key finding of this study was that depression is more often associated with severe stroke, but the available evidence presently does not allow the identification of patients who are most at risk of depression.

Ms Hackett noted that "Current models of depression after stroke are not accurate, have not been rigorously developed and validated, are not well described, and are not clinically useful for predicting the occurrence of depression after stroke. Additional research in this area would be of considerable importance not only in terms of increasing our understanding of depression risk factors but also in advancing health care delivery to enhance stroke rehabilitation.

"The data suggests that clinicians should be particularly vigilant to the detection of depression among patients with severe strokes and stroke-related disability."

Paul Davies | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.thegeorgeinstitute.org
http://www.researchaustralia.com.au/

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht The personality factor: How to foster the sharing of research data
06.09.2017 | ZBW – Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft

nachricht Europe’s Demographic Future. Where the Regions Are Heading after a Decade of Crises
10.08.2017 | Berlin-Institut für Bevölkerung und Entwicklung

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

Im Focus: Artificial Enzymes for Hydrogen Conversion

Scientists from the MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion report in the first issue of the new journal JOULE.

Cell Press has just released the first issue of Joule, a new journal dedicated to sustainable energy research. In this issue James Birrell, Olaf Rüdiger,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

New quantum phenomena in graphene superlattices

19.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A simple additive to improve film quality

19.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>