Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study reveals who is really considering plastic surgery

30.08.2005


Hint: It’s not who you think!



In the first-ever research of its kind, a study conducted by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) details the people considering plastic surgery and their motivations, debunking many stereotypes. The study, published in the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the ASPS, found potential patients came from all economic levels and age ranges. Their motivations were personal but not vanity oriented, the study also found.

"Finally we have a study that reveals the truth about real people considering plastic surgery," said Walter Erhardt, MD, chair of the ASPS Public Education Committee. "It’s not just women over 50 with high incomes who are seriously considering procedures. It’s the young mom next door, the waiter who served you coffee this morning, even your coworker."


The study, which polled 644 people considering plastic surgery within the next two years, found almost 30 percent, or 191 participants, reported average household incomes of less than $30,000. Forty-one percent had annual incomes of $31,000 to $60,000, and 16 percent had annual incomes of $61,000 to $90,000. Only 13 percent reported average household incomes of more than $90,000 per year.

Also, the participants’ age ranges varied; 26 percent were 18 to 29 years old, 38 percent were 30 to 49 years old and 36 percent were 50 years or older. Eighty-one percent of respondents had not undergone plastic surgery while 19 percent had already had at least one cosmetic procedure. The people polled came from all regions of the United States. More than 85 percent were Caucasian and 85 percent were women, according to the study.

In addition to the general poll, 60 in-depth interviews were conducted with people actively considering plastic surgery. These people had sought information from the ASPS Physician Referral Service in the past 18 months. More than 40 percent of these potential patients had been considering plastic surgery for quite some time, often more than a year.

Most of those interviewed felt they could achieve emotional, psychological and social improvements by having plastic surgery. Although most participants were interested in having plastic surgery to improve their appearance, many emphasized they were not motivated by vanity. Instead, they associated plastic surgery with improving a bothersome physical feature to overcome dissatisfaction and unhappiness with that feature.

When asked why they wanted to have plastic surgery, 75 percent of those interviewed said to gain physical benefits such as improved appearance, becoming more active and being healthier. Approximately 70 percent reported emotional and psychological benefits such as increased happiness, self-esteem and self-confidence. In addition, 45 percent -- more notably men than women -- expected social benefits from plastic surgery, including being more accepted and more attractive to others.

More than 85 percent of those interviewed stated the benefits of plastic surgery far outweighed the risks. They believed the risks would be minimal if they did their homework by researching the procedure and locating a qualified plastic surgeon. Also, membership in the ASPS was an important factor when looking for a plastic surgeon, demonstrating the surgeon was a skilled professional with proper accreditation.

"ASPS is dedicated to educating potential plastic surgery patients by offering quality information and referrals to experienced, certified plastic surgeons," said Dr. Erhardt. "We were thrilled to learn many patients are actively seeking information before having any cosmetic procedure, helping ensure a safe and successful outcome."

LaSandra Cooper | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.plasticsurgery.org

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>