Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Largest study to date reveals baseline findings for flexible sigmoidoscopy


The largest study to date on the early detection of colorectal cancer offers benchmark data for what could be expected from large-scale use of flexible sigmoidoscopy as a screening tool for colorectal cancer. The report, published in the July 6 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute (JNCI), is part of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, a randomized, community-based longitudinal study evaluating the effectiveness of cancer screening tests on site-specific mortality.

"In our opinion, we now have published important and valuable baseline data on the use of flexible sigmoidoscopy within a large and randomized group of participants," said Joel Weissfeld, M.D., M.P.H, lead author of the study and associate professor of epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. "The findings reveal trends and patterns by gender and age that one may expect to see in a flexible sigmoidoscopy intervention targeting the general U.S. population," added Dr. Weissfeld, who also is co-leader of the cancer epidemiology, prevention and control program at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute.

During flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG), a doctor uses a lighted scope to examine the inside of the large intestine from the rectum through the descending colon, where most colon polyps develop.

The study enrolled 154,942 men and women 55 to 74 years of age who had no prior history of prostate, lung, colorectal or ovarian cancers from November 1993 to July 2001. Study participants were randomly assigned to either a control group that did not receive FSG or to an intervention group that received FSG. Of those assigned to the intervention group, 83.5 percent (64,658) agreed to undergo an initial FSG examination. Among the individuals who underwent screening, 23.4 percent (15,150) had at least one polyp or mass and 74.2 percent of these individuals received follow-up lower endoscopic procedures. Findings also indicated that women were more likely to decline FSG than men, 19.2 percent and 13.8 percent respectively, and that non-acceptance of FSG increased with age among women, but not among men. The rate of cancer detected was 2.9 per 1,000 individuals screened.

"These data are important because they create a U.S. benchmark to which other studies can be compared," said Robert E. Schoen, M.D., M.P.H., study co-author and associate professor of medicine and epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. "Of note is that a high percentage of study participants were willing to undergo flexible sigmoidoscopy, perhaps reflecting a growing acceptance of screening for colorectal cancer."

Colorectal cancer is a worldwide public health problem. In the United States, colorectal cancer accounts for 11 percent of all cancers, with 145,290 new cases and 56,290 deaths expected in 2005. For patients with advanced disease, five-year survival rates are 10 to 20 percent. When colorectal cancer is diagnosed at an early, localized stage, the five-year survival rate is 90 percent.

Clare Collins | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturing
14.02.2018 | Rutgers University

nachricht New study from the University of Halle: How climate change alters plant growth
12.01.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>