Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study is first to implicate dietary fat in ’fatty liver’

03.05.2005


A University of Minnesota study is the first to show that if you eat too much fat, it can go straight to your liver and damage it.



In obese people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), fat from the diet ends up "stuck" in the liver, where it doesn’t belong. It was known that the livers of NAFLD patients accumulated fat, but its origin was unknown. The new work implicates fat from the diet as one cause of NAFLD and shows that fat buildup in the liver results when the liver loses its ability to manage the various influxes of fat that occur during transitions between the fasted and fed states. Identifying the origins of accumulated fat in the livers of NAFLD patients will be important in preventing and reversing this condition, which can lead to more serious liver trouble. The work will be published May 2 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

"This is the first scientific proof of dietary fat stored in the liver in humans," said Elizabeth Parks, an associate professor of human nutrition, who led the study. "In health, it’s the liver’s job to store glycogen--a storage form of carbohydrates--not fat." The clear implication is that too much dietary fat leads the liver to fail in its mission as the body’s central shipping and receiving center for fat. No longer does it take in dietary fat, repackage it and send it on its way back out into the blood. In obesity, fat builds up in the liver. The fat comes both straight from the diet and also from sugars that the liver turns into fat. As a result, the liver functions poorly.


In healthy people, about half the fat from a meal is burned for energy, and the rest is shunted to adipose tissue, where it is stored until needed during fasting. Very little fat is normally stored in the liver.

Working with obese subjects who had NAFLD, Parks and her colleagues fed the subjects food containing fats labeled with deuterium, a rare but stable form of hydrogen that can be used to trace fats as they move through the body. The subjects were already scheduled for liver biopsies, and Parks’ team gave the patients labeled fat for five days before their biopsy. The researchers analyzed the waste liver tissue from the biopsies and found that these patients’ livers had globules of fat--about 20 percent of it from the diet. Furthermore, the liver’s synthesis of fat from dietary carbohydrates was also elevated.

Once thought benign, fatty liver is now considered a component of a condition called metabolic syndrome, which occurs most often in overweight people and whose features include insulin resistance and cholesterol abnormalities. Fatty liver is also a precursor to the more advanced liver disease nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, which may progress to cirrhosis of the liver in up to 25 percent of patients, said Parks.

"The bottom line is, this is a clear implication that if one eats too much fat, as in the film ’Super Size Me,’ fat becomes deposited in the liver. This leads to a kind of liver toxicity that would be good to avoid," said Parks.

Deane Morrison | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.umn.edu

More articles from Studies and Analyses:

nachricht New study: How does Europe become a leading player for software and IT services?
03.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

nachricht Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
30.03.2017 | Rochester Institute of Technology

All articles from Studies and Analyses >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Physicists discover mechanism behind granular capillary effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Measured for the first time: Direction of light waves changed by quantum effect

24.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>